Degree Programs, Minors, Majors

 DISCIPLINARY B.A. PROGRAM
MINOR in Classical Studies is 24 credits earned as follows:

18 from Classics, Latin, or Greek; or PHIL 1601
6 from Classics, Latin, or Greek at the 3/4000 level

Students may choose a minor program with an emphasis on Ancient History, Classical Literature or Art and Archaeology 



 MINOR in Greek is 24 credits earned as follows:

18 from GREK 1001, 1101, 2001, 2101, and Greek at the 3000 level

6 from Greek, Latin, or Classics



MINOR in Latin is 24 credits earned as follows:

18 from LATI 1001, 1101, 2001, 2101, and Latin at the 3000 level

6 from Greek, Latin, or Classics



 MAJOR in Classical Studies is 60 credits earned as follows:

6 from LATI 1001, 1101, GREK 1001, 1101
3
6 from Classics, Greek, Latin, of which 24 must be from the 3/4000 level

18 from complementary courses in Arts and Letters and Humanities (or others), chosen in consultation with the Program Advisor



 HONOURS in Classical Studies is 72 credits earned as follows:

12 from LATI 1001, 1101, GREK 1001, 1101

6 from LATI 2001, 2101, GREK 2001, 2101

6 from Greek/Latin at the 3000/4000 level OR CLAS 4950/4951

48 from Classics/Greek/Latin, of which 33 must be at the 3/4000 level


 

 The following courses are being offered this year. For a full listing of Classics courses, please consult the academic calendar.

 

 
 

2017 – 2018 Courses

                                                                                                         FALL 2017

 

CLAS 1631: Greece & Rome: The Foundations of Western Civilization (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
The political and social history of ancient Greece and Rome will be surveyed with a focus on the themes of Law, Politics, War, and Society. Special attention will be paid to Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. and to Rome under Caesar Augustus.
[Note: This course is cross-listed with HIST 1631 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]


CLAS 2501: Introduction to Archaeology (3 credits)

Instructor: C. Gardner
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
An introduction to the methods of archaeological excavation. This course aims to acquaint the student with the theory and basic techniques of archaeology. Examples showing both past and present archaeological research done in the Old and New Worlds will be used to illustrate the topics under discussion.


CLAS 3021: Conquest and Expansion: the Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic (3 credits)

Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department.
An examination of the development of Rome from a small city-state into the leading power in the Mediterranean. Main themes include the conflict between Rome and Carthage, the conquest of the Hellenistic East, and the political and social changes in Roman society. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation.
[Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]


CLAS 3411: The Epic Poetry of Greece and Rome (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Forstall
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department.
An examination of the epic genre as it developed in ancient Greece and Rome. The focus of the course will be on Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid, with attention given to other representative works. The poems will be studied (in translation) both as products of their respective societies and in light of their influence on later European literature. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)


CLAS 3701: Etruscan and Early Roman Art and Archaeology (3 credits)

Instructor:S. Ehrlich
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, FINH, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department.
A study of the art and archaeology of peninsular Italy from the Iron Age to the period of the Julio-Claudian emperors. It will examine Etruscan culture and its interaction with the Greeks and Romans, the rise of Rome, and the transitions from republic to empire. The material culture of Italy will be explored through the architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts.
[Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History.]


GREK 2001: Intermediate Greek (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Forstall
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: GREK 1101; or permission of the Department.
This course introduces students to the reading of unadapted passages from ancient authors. While the emphasis is on developing a fluency in reading Greek, it also reviews basic Greek grammar and presents some more advanced grammar and syntax.


LATI 1001: Introductory Latin I (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Gardner
Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour
Exclusion: LATI 1000
An introduction to basic Latin grammar and vocabulary for students with no previous knowledge of the language. This course is based on readings which present not only the fundamentals of Latin but also the Roman world in which it was used. Some effort is made to show the connections between Latin and modern languages (English, French, Spanish). Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun.


LATI 2001: Intermediate Latin (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: LATI 1101; or permission of the Department.
This course introduces students to the reading of unadapted passages from ancient authors. While the emphasis is on developing a fluency in reading Latin, it also reviews basic Latin grammar and presents some more advanced grammar and syntax.


LATI 2001: Intermediate Latin (3 credits)

Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: LATI 1101; or permission of the Department.
This course introduces students to the reading of unadapted passages from ancient authors. While the emphasis is on developing a fluency in reading Latin, it also reviews basic Latin grammar and presents some more advanced grammar and syntax.


WINTER 2018

CLAS 1641: Classical Mythology: The Hero’s Quest (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Fosrtall
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
An introduction to the heroes and heroines of classical myth through the literature and art of ancient Greece and Rome. The course will examine the major cycles of Greek heroic saga, including stories about the Trojan War, the Wanderings of Odysseus, the exploits of Hercules, and the Voyage of Jason and the Argonauts, as well as the adventures of Aeneas and the foundation myths of Rome.


CLAS 2021: Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World(3 credits)

Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Exclusion: CLAS/HIST 3011
An examination of the career of Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic era that followed his conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. Among the main themes included will the goals of Alexander, the new political climate of kingship and patronage that he helped create, the interaction of the Greeks with the civilizations of Egypt and the East, and the integration of new cultural ideas into Greek society.
[Note: This course is cross-listed with HIST 2021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]


CLAS 2521: The Archaeology of Daily Life in the Greek and Roman World
(3 credits)
Instructor: C. Gardner
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
An examination of the evidence used by archaeologists to recreate the social history of ancient Greece and Rome. The course will consider how archaeology can shed light on such topics as the lives of men, women, and children; the home; government; the economy; the army; and entertainment.


CLAS 3031: The Roman Empire: Centre and Periphery (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department.
An examination of the history of imperial Rome from the age of Augustus to that of Constantine. Main themes include the imperial form of government, the Roman army, urban development and its impact on society, and the conflicts between Romans and other cultures. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation.
[Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3031 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]


CLAS 3401: The Lyric Poetry of Greece and Rome (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Forstall
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department.
A study of Greek and Roman poetry that expresses universal feelings of love and fear, celebration and personal aspiration. The course will examine the themes and forms of lyric poetry, as well as the role of the poet in society. The poems of Sappho, Archilochus, Pindar, Catullus, Propertius, Ovid, and others will be read in English translation.


CLAS 3711: The Art of Imperial Rome and Its Empire (3 credits)

Instructor: C. Gardner
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, FINH, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department.
A study of the art and archaeology of the Roman world from the reign of the emperor Nero to the time of Constantine. It will examine the development of art and architecture in Rome, the connections between this development and imperial policy, and the use and adaptation in other parts of the Roman world of ideas which originated in Rome.
[Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History.]


CLAS 3991: Special Topic in Digital Methods (3 credits)

Instructor: C. Forstall
Format: Variable
Prereq: second-year standing; 3 Credits from CLAS, HIST, LATI, GREK at the 1/2000 level.
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: Students may register for CLAS 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.]

CLAS 4951: Religious Identity in the Graeco World (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Gardner
This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for CLAS 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)


GREK 2101: Introductory Readings in Greek Literature (3 credits)

Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: GREK 2001; or permission of the Department.
A reading of selected works by Greek authors. This course will acquaint the student with some of the forms of ancient prose and poetry.


LATI 1101: Introductory Latin II (3 credits)
Instructor: S. Ehrlich
Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour
Prereq: LATI 1001; or permission of the Department.
Exclusion: LATI 1000
A continuation of the study of the Latin language. While adding new grammar, this course concentrates on reading comprehension and vocabulary building. Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun.


LATI 2101: Introductory Readings in Latin Literature (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: LATI 2001; or permission of the Department.
A reading of selected works by Latin authors. This course will acquaint the student with some of the forms of ancient prose and poetry.


LATI 3101: Readings in Latin Poetry (3 credits)

Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: LATI 2101; or permission of the Department.
The translation and study of the work of one or more Latin poets.