Philosophy students awarded summer research grants

Three Philosophy students are looking forward to spending the summer working on a research topic of their choice. Third year students, Madeleine Leger, Hanna Longard and Catherine Turnbull each received funding through the Independent Summer Research Grant program to implement their own project, under supervision of a faculty member.

 MLeger

 Madeleine Leger speaks passionately about her proposed research on the philosophy of language. She will be investigating how the ideas of the late British philosopher, J.L. Austin, could be harmonized with modern feminist philosophy. Later this summer, she will travel to Oxford's Bodleian Library in England as part of her research.

 

 CTurnbull

 When Catherine Turnbull took a philosophy class in her first year she realized that she “thrived in an environment where I can dig really deep and layer the questions.” Inspired by feminist scholar Sarah Ahmed’s criticisms of contemporary feminism, Catherine is investigating whether post-constructionist feminist philosophers do an adequate job of citing authors from a wide variety of backgrounds.

 Also, congratulations to Catherine for recently winning the 2018 CDSA-ACEH Student Paper Award competition for her work “Suggestions for a Cripistemology of Pain and Gender: Bolstering Feminist Analysis of Pain Experiences through a Pain-Centric Model.”

 

HLongard

 Hanna Longard combines her interests in biology and philosophy to engage the community in conversations about green death care. She is asking the question, “when our bodies die, do they harm or help the earth?” Hanna will be interviewing funeral directors, palliative care workers and other community members to build a picture of their attitudes towards environmentally-friendly death care practices.

 


 

 

Dykemanthumb

Health care's problem solver

Mary Jane Dykeman knew from an early age that she wanted to follow in her father's footsteps and practise law. But it wasn't until she met the late Dr. Ross Stanway, a professor of philosophy at Mount Allison, that her path became clear. Read more in the Record.