Subject: Liquor Policy
Group: Institutional
Approved by: The President
Approval date: October 21, 1994
Effective date: October 21, 1994
Revised: February 20, 2012
Administered by: Vice-President, International & Student Affairs
 
INTRODUCTION

At Mount Allison, the academic education of students is complemented by their social, emotional, and physical development. It is important to maintain an environment conducive to academic study and appropriate extracurricular activities. Liquor policy at Mount Allison is one component of that environment.

The onus is on each member of the university community, student or staff, to contribute to the responsible use of alcohol and to uphold the privilege of the Special Facility Licence which is granted to the University contingent upon compliance with statutory requirements and internal policies and regulations.

Liquor policy at Mount Allison emanates from two sources:
 
The Liquor Control Act which provides regulations in a number of areas including:

  • Operation of Special Facility Licences;
  • Servers Requirements;
  • Gifts by Breweries & Distilleries;
  • Consumption of Liquor by Minors;
  • Sale, Purchase and Possession of Liquor;
  • Club Licences;
  • Places of Consumption; and
  • Provision of Alcohol to Intoxicated Persons.

Liquor policy at Mount Allison must respect the laws of the land and be appropriate to the aims of the University, which has an obligation to educate its community members, to be concerned about each individual's safety, and to provide leadership on pressing societal issues of which some alcohol practices are examples.

 

Liquor policy at Mount Allison assumes

  1. recognition of each individual's right to decide whether or not to consume alcohol,
  2. an understanding of what responsible drinking is, and
  3. knowledge of some fundamental facts about alcohol in general which are elaborated on immediately below.

Every individual has the right to decide whether or not to consume alcohol.
 
In order to drink responsibly, we should know:

  • the effects of alcohol on our bodies,
  • factors which affect the rate of absorption,
  • how to avoid overindulgence, and
  • how to recognize if we have a drinking problem.

Responsible drinking is:

  • Drinking in moderation, not to excess (know your limit)
  • Being considerate of friends and others around you.
  • Saying "no" when you really don't want to drink.
  • Not driving after drinking.
  • Knowing that you do not have to drink to be "one of the crowd."
  • Knowing when you've had enough and saying so.
  • Being a responsible party host.
  • Not forcing drinks on other people.
  • Not drinking alcohol in a game or in a competitive manner.
  • Taking advantage of other things to do besides drinking.
  • Being careful about combining prescription drugs and alcohol.
  • Influencing your drinking friends to be responsible.
  • Being concerned about a friend's drinking habits.

General facts about alcohol:

  • Legal age in NB — 19 years.
  • 1 beer = 1 1/2 oz. liquor = 5 oz. red or white wine.
  • Drinking in moderation constitutes approximately 1 drink per hour depending on body weight and depending on the length of time spent drinking.
  • Women absorb alcohol into the bloodstream faster and metabolize it slower than men.
  • Alcohol is a nervous system depressant.
  • Vomiting is part of the automatic defense system of the body activated to prevent more alcohol from being absorbed.
  • Poor judgment is a natural outcome when the brain is influenced by alcohol.The path of alcohol in the body is the mouth, stomach, small intestine, heart, brain and the liver.
  • If someone passes out and will not respond to attempts to wake them, it is very possible they are suffering from alcohol poisoning.
  • Some people believe that drinking coffee, taking a cold shower or sleeping 3 or 4 hours will significantly accelerate acquiring sobriety. This is not true.
  • Food, especially high protein items, will slow absorption of alcohol.


PRINCIPLES ON WHICH THE LIQUOR POLICY IS BASED
 
Three focal points of this policy are prevention, intervention, and discipline. It is understood that prevention incorporates both education and policy initiatives.

The University liquor policy is designed to encourage responsible planning of alcohol related events.

All members of the University community are responsible for their actions at all times.

High risk alcohol related practices are strongly discouraged and/or banned.

The needs of those who are non-drinkers or underage must be respected. Applying social pressure on others to drink is prohibited.

Drinking should not be the primary focus of any activity.

Activities which incorporate accelerated drinking are strongly discouraged and/or banned.

The above principles should not be sacrificed owing to financial constraint or financial or material gain.

 

EDUCATION
 
The University, through Student Life, provides education to students on the consumption and use of alcohol.
 
Campus alcohol education includes:

  1. Information: A variety of information is available year round in the Office of Student Life and through residence and Wellness Centre staff.
  2. The Residence Community Alcohol Policy: This policy is circulated to all residence students in September each year.
  3. Orientation Week: Welcoming activities exclusively for first year students are planned without alcohol.
  4. First Year Residence Orientation Program: This program is produced by Student Life, the House Executive and Residence Staff. It enables students to discuss what constitutes responsible drinking, and, through a multiple choice questionnaire, gives some basic facts about drinking. The purpose is to educate or raise awareness amongst students on alcohol information.
  5. Counsellors: The University's Wellness Centre staff includes personal counsellors to whom individuals can refer students who need help in the areas of alcohol dependency problems, violence while drinking, and other alcohol related programming.
  6. Local Referral Agencies:
    • a. Local Hospital (e.g. in case of alcohol poisoning) 364-4100
    • b. Addictions Counselling in Sackville 364-4100
    • c. (Weekly (Wednesday) clinic at the Sackville Hospital)     
    • d. Addiction Services in Moncton 856-2333
    • e. Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 536-2588; after 5 p.m., 536-1106 
      http://www.area81aa.ca/meetinglists/District3.pdf

     

LIQUOR POLICIES
 
1. Types of Licenses:
The University operates under a Special Facility Licence.

The University Club operates under the University's Special Facility Licence. It is administered by the Club's Board of Directors.

The University may also operate under a Special Events License.

2. Consumption of Liquor on Campus
The University does not condone the consumption or service of alcohol in violation of the Liquor Control Act. In particular, the University does not condone underage drinking.

Furthermore, the University reserves the right to control the consumption or service of alcohol on its property even in cases where such consumption or service is not in violation of the Act.
 
For these reasons, the consumption or service of alcohol on campus is prohibited except in the following locations and circumstances, and subject to the following conditions:

  • apartments and student rooms in residences;
  • the University Club in accordance with the University's Special Facility License;
  • the common areas of residences as authorized by the Director of Student Life (See Appendix B);
  • campus events held in accordance with the University’s Special Facility License; and
  • campus events held in accordance with any other license issued by the Province.

3. Age of Legal Consumption
The age at which it is legal to consume alcohol in New Brunswick and at Mount Allison is 19. It is an offence to supply alcohol to anyone under the age of 19.
 
4. Hours of Operation
During the academic year, Student Life will determine the hours of operation of residence floor and lounge parties.

Licensed events in non academic buildings will normally not continue past midnight other than in the Wallace McCain Student Centre when they may take place until 2:00 a.m.

5. Pricing of Beverages sold in licensed premises Age of Legal Consumption
The purpose of this section is to ensure that non-alcoholic beverages are available at reasonable prices and also that low pricing of alcoholic beverages will not lead to the promotion of irresponsible consumption.
 
Alcohol
The sale price of alcohol will not be artificially low and shall be, at a minimum, in accordance with provincial regulations concerning the sale of alcohol.
 
Non-alcohol
The selling price of non-alcoholic beverages should be set such that the selling price is not artificially high.
 
6. Numbers of Patrons permitted at alcohol events:

a. Residence Floor Parties
The maximum number of patrons is twice the number of people who live on the floor.
      
b. Residence common areas
There are limits on the capacity of residence common areas as specified in Appendix B.
      
c. Licensable premises in non-residence buildings
Fire marshal's regulations limit the number of patrons as specified in Appendix A.

7. Sources of Alcohol Consumption on Campus
Alcohol can only be sold or served on campus by the University, or by the University Club, either under the University’s Special Facility Licence at the locations listed in Appendix A or under a special events licence in other locations.

No one may bring alcohol into a licensed event or into an authorized residence party.
 
Alcohol given to student or other groups by breweries/wineries/distilleries that have purchased it from the liquor store for donation of product to residences:

  • For permitted student residence floor and lounge parties, alcohol given to student groups by breweries/wineries/distilleries which have purchased it from the liquor store is permitted in accordance with stipulations in Section 13 below.

8. Open Liquor
It is an offence for anyone to have open liquor anywhere on campus outside residence rooms except for those 19 and over at licensed events, or at residence events authorized by the Director of Student Life, or in a residence in accordance with that residence’s rules.

Open liquor is, for example: a cup with alcohol in it, an open bottle of beer or wine or liquor, an open case of beer even if the bottles are all capped, loose bottles in your knapsack or pockets unless they were individually purchased at the Liquor Store and are being transported from that store to a residence, a flat of canned beer in which any can has been removed from the plastic rings. Event Services Staff and Residence Staff have the right to search for and seize unauthorized alcohol.

The University’s liquor license allows for underage students to be at wet/dry events in which students over 19 may drink alcohol (wet) and those under 19 may not (dry). Be aware that, at some student events, alcohol drinks are served in a cup of one colour while non-alcoholic drinks are served in a cup of a different colour. It is an offence for underage students to be drinking from the wrong coloured cup or for legal age students to be drinking from the wrong coloured cup if they have had their hand stamped as a non-liquor drinker. In addition, for some events, students may be required to wear a bracelet indicating they are of age to drink.
 
9. Bus Trips
Because it is illegal for individuals to sell, serve or possess liquor on a bus or in other road vehicles, students and student groups renting buses or vans or contracting with a company for chauffeur driver transportation are expected to ensure that there is no open liquor or consumption of alcohol in the vehicles. Organizers of such trips are responsible for enforcing this expectation, using residence or Event Services staff at the point of departure or on the trip, if necessary.
 
10. Transport of Alcohol
Liquor Store (A) to Residence (B) to Another Location (C):

Transportation of alcohol in original sealed containers from A to B or from B to C is permissible except that unopened individual beer bottles bought individually at the liquor store, which may be transported from A to B, may not be transported from B to C.

No alcohol may be transported outside residences under any circumstances including backpacks and suitcases if it is not in the original sealed container.

It is an offence to take alcohol into or remove alcohol from a licensed area or an authorized residence party.
 
11. Brewery Donations of Alcohol
Those making brewery/winery. distillery donations to students and other University groups must comply with the following regulations.

  • i. By March 20th, the breweries/wineries/distilleries are expected to provide the name of the student representative(s) for the following year to the Director of Student Life.   
  • ii. By March 27th, breweries/wineries/distilleries are expected to provide the Director of Student Life with copies of the representative's job description and any other instructions provided to the representative(s).     
  • iii. By April 30th, the Director of Student Life and all brewery/winery/distillery representatives will meet to acknowledge University policy that relates to alcohol donations to students and student groups.
  • iv. On December 1st and April 1st, the brewery/winery/distillery representatives will report to the Director of Student Life on all give-aways of brewery/winery/distillery products, both alcohol and other merchandise, to students or to student groups.
  • v. Alcohol donations must not be resold.
  • vi. For residence and off-campus student groups, the only donation of alcohol possible by breweries/wineries/distilleries is donations of alcohol purchased by the brewery/winery/distillery at the liquor store and given to the student group. For other events on campus, i.e. those in licensable premises, the brewery/winery/distillery may only give a cash donation to the group putting on the event.
  • vii.Events at which brewery/winery/distillery donations are used must conform to Provincial and University policies in general.
12. Identification

Students are expected to have their student ID cards on them at all times and to display them to University officials including Event Services Staff and Security when requested. Lying about one’s identity is a serious offence.

In order to be admitted to a licensed campus event, a student must present a government-issued photo ID that shows his or her age.

Non students must be signed into the Pond, into any licensed student event, or into any authorized residence party by a student who will be responsible for the actions of the non-student he or she signs in.
 
13. Advertising
Advertising for liquor events must comply with Provincial regulations and with the University Policy.

A. General
Advertising for events on campus is not permitted in non-University publications.

The following refers to all advertising including posters and campus media, which includes but is not restricted to web sites, e-mail, social media such as Facebook and Twitter, for events that would be held on- or off-campus and that are organized by on- or off-campus organizations.

  • i. The words liquor, wine, spirits, beer, ale, bar, saloon, or words of like import can be used.
  • ii. Free alcohol may not be advertised.
  • iii. The advertising in no way should promote over consumption, or the suggestion of reduced prices.
  • iv. Pictures, drawings. designs, etc., of beverage glasses, pitchers, bottles and labels can be displayed

B. Poster Advertising:
      
i. Major Events on campus:
     
According to Provincial laws, brewery poster advertising is permissible.

At any one time, each brewery may post a maximum of two posters on campus, only in the following locations: one in the Student Centre and one in the entrance to the Jennings dining hall.

No brewery posters are to appear anywhere else on campus including University residences and inside the University dining hall.

It is the responsibility of student brewery representatives on campus to ensure that only one set of posters is up at any given time and that the wording on the posters complies with provincial requirements.
      
ii. Residence floor or lounge parties on campus:
In accordance with University policies pertaining to residence parties, no public advertising (i.e. posters on campus or announcements in the Argosy, over CHMA, at the Pond, at semi-formals, or through social media or websites) is permitted. The only forms of advertising of residence parties that are permissible are: advertising within the House in which the party is to be held, visible only inside the House, advertising in Jennings Hall, a distribution of tickets via Residence Council; and invitations individually addressed and delivered in person, by campus mail or by individually addressed e-mail.
      
c. Brewery Vehicles
Brewery vehicles are not permitted on campus.
      
d. CHMA
CHMA must comply with all applicable provincial laws and regulations and with University policy.
      
e. The Argosy
Advertising in The ARGOSY must comply with all applicable provincial laws and regulations and with University Policy.
      
f. Other University Publications
Any alcohol related advertising in other University publications (such as the Allisonian, programs for concerts, plays and sports, and schedules of events for Winter Carnival, Homecoming and Convocation) must be accompanied by advertisements sponsored by a variety of non-alcohol enterprises.

14. Other Alcohol Related Promotions
Alcohol related promotions (which include the provision of prizes such as T-shirts and key chains, for example) are seen as being potentially beneficial but, except in the case of the Pond, require prior approval of the Director of Student Life.
 
Promotions may be permissible provided that:
 
a. they do not promote consumption of alcohol in irresponsible amounts;
b. they do not discriminate against non-drinkers or underage patrons;
c. the type of promotion is appropriate; and
d. they fall within provincial and University guidelines.
 
"Drink and Win" promotions, such as those that require the purchase of a drink to attain eligibility for a draw to win prizes, must not be used because 1) they exclude underage drinkers, and 2) they associate the notion of drinking with the notion of winning. Give-aways by breweries of items such as hats and jackets inside licensed events must be available to all patrons equally.

The University accepts promotions such as brewery sponsorship of Alcohol Awareness Week, designated driver programs and other responsible drinking campaigns.

Note: Any alcohol related promotion not specifically authorized by the policies in this document is not permitted.
 
15. Event Services
Additional Event Services Staff beyond the necessary licensed servers may be required at events where the University is serving alcohol under a license.
 
 
INTERVENTION

The onus is on each member of the University community, student, faculty or staff, to contribute to the responsible use of alcohol and to uphold the privilege of the Special Facility License which is granted to the University contingent upon compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements.

The contribution of each member of the community may mean expressing sincere care and concern for someone who has a problem with alcohol. It may mean referring or reporting a case or a situation to a personal counsellor or Human Resources who have more specific responsibilities. It may mean reacting with common sense if a regulation is being broken.

Event organizers and sponsors, residence staff, event services and security have specific responsibilities as outlined in applicable policies and procedures or in training instructions.
 
DISCIPLINE

Members of the university community who commit infractions of University Liquor policy are subject to the relevant code or collective agreement.
 
 
RECOMMENDATIONS
 
EDUCATION
There should be a regular review of the extent of training for event services staff, residence staff, and student leaders.

The University Community should be made aware of the policies outlined in this document. Student Club and Society Presidents, House Presidents and Social Chairs, Residence Staff, and SAC Representatives should be notified annually.

A review of efforts made to promote awareness of self-help programs including Counselling Services, brochures available at Student Life and Alcoholics Anonymous should be conducted regularly.

Information published by the Conference Office should include references to relevant policies in this document.

An effort should be made to create greater awareness that open liquor on campus, bringing alcohol into licensed events and drinking at events when stamped dry are offences.
 
 
APPENDIX "A"
 
SPECIAL FACILITY LICENSE

PREMISES COVERED AND THEIR MAXIMUM OCCUPANCIES:

ATHLETIC CENTRE
Main gymnasium — 1000
Lecture room —  40
Lounge — 40
    
CRABTREE BUILDING
Foyer — 200

JENNINGS HALL
Jennings Hall — 800

OWENS ART GALLERY
Gallery 6 (upstairs) — 275
Gallery 1 — 90
Gallery 3 (a.k.a. lobby) — 100
Gallery 2 — 90
Gallery 4 — 95 

PRESIDENT'S COTTAGE
Room 100 — 22
Room 101 — 15
Room 102 — 20
Room 107 — 17 
    
STUDENT CENTRE
Gracie’s Café — 330
Multipurpose Room — 60
Tweedie Hall — 200
Tweedie Hall / Outdoor terrace — 300
Pond — 150
Solarium — 50
Trueman Atrium — 200
   
Appendix B
 
RESIDENCE PARTY AUTHORIZATIONS
 
A residence party where alcohol can be consumed will not be approved by Student Life until a risk assessment form has been submitted in respect of the party.

Event Services Staff (ESS) must be in attendance when alcohol is served. The norm for events is to have one ESS to every 50 participants.

The capacities of residence lounges and other residence common rooms for residence parties and their maximum capacities are as follows:
 

Appendix C
 
ALCOHOL & DRUGS AND YOU AT MOUNT ALLISON
 
Did you know that substance abuse — especially of alcohol — is the single greatest threat to the quality of campus life? (Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 1990). Research shows that alcohol is related to the vast majority of disciplinary charges, damages, and physical and sexual assaults that occur on university campuses.

Did you also know that developing a pattern of regular drug or alcohol use while you are young greatly increases your chances of moving to serious levels of abuse within ONE to FOUR YEARS? Think of what that would do to the plans and goals you have now, as you enter university.

Knowing these facts, and in keeping with our mission statement to promote healthy development of the whole person, Mount Allison University has established firm, realistic expectations for students. University resources are also allocated for students experiencing difficulties. Please contact Student Life if you have questions or would like help of any kind.

You will be held responsible for your conduct. To prevent any misunderstanding about the laws and regulations concerning drugs and alcohol at Mount Allison, you are urged to read carefully the points stated here.
 
DRUGS
 
Use of illegal drugs on our campus is forbidden. Mount Allison also has a policy with respect to the use of banned substances related to athletic performance. Student athletes are expected to refrain from using banned substances and to refrain from encouraging others to use banned substances.
 
ALCOHOL
 
You should be aware of the following 11 points:
 
1.The age at which it is legal to consume alcohol (in New Brunswick and at Mount Allison University) is 19. At the University you may be charged with drinking when under the legal age. If you come from a province or country where the legal age is different or non-existent then you must be aware of this when you make your party plans. The University’s liquor license allows for underage students to be at “wet/dry events” in which students 19 or over may drink alcohol (wet) and under 19 may not (dry). Be aware that at some student events, alcoholic drinks are served in a cup of one colour while non-alcoholic drinks are served in a cup of a different colour (or a bracelet may be used to designate “wet” from “dry”). It is an offence to be drinking if you are underage.
      
2. It is an offence to supply alcohol to anyone under the age of 19. Providing alcohol to someone under the legal drinking age is a charge which is considered even more serious than drinking while under age.
      
3. It is an offence for anyone at all to have open liquor anywhere on campus outside residence rooms except for individuals 19 and over who are at licensed events or authorized residence parties. If you have open liquor anywhere on campus outside residence, except during officially licensed events such as semi-formal dances, you can expect to be charged. If you have open liquor in residence outside your room, at any time other than during an officially permitted party, you are normally subject to a charge. Note that while alcohol policy is generally uniform from residence to residence, you will find that interpretation of what constitutes open liquor in residence does vary somewhat from one residence to another. You are responsible for knowing the standards of each residence you visit just as you are responsible for knowing about differences in provincial regulations when you travel across Canada.
      
4. What constitutes open liquor? ...open liquor is, for example: a cup with alcohol in it, an open bottle of beer, wine, liquor, an open case of beer even if the bottles of beer are all capped, loose bottles in your knapsack or pockets unless the bottles were individually purchased at the liquor store and are being transported from that store to a residence, a flat of canned beer in which any can has been removed from the plastic rings. For open liquor outside of residence, it doesn’t matter whether you are charged with possession of open liquor by the local police or within the University, the result is the same: your mistake will cost you. You may be charged if you are transporting liquor across campus or if you leave a licensed area with an unfinished drink or for drinking in the hallway of your University residence during a time when an official floor party permit has not been authorized. Within the residence system, each residence on campus has its own interpretation of rules concerning open liquor. To avoid being charged, learn what open liquor means in your residence and be aware that what is deemed acceptable in your residence may not be so in another residence.
      
5. Transport of Alcohol from Liquor Store (A) to Residence (B) to another location (C): Transportation of alcohol in original sealed containers from (A) to (B) or from (B) to (C) is permissible except that unopened individual beer bottles bought at the liquor store cannot be transported from (B) to (C).

No alcohol may be transported outside residences under any circumstances including within backpacks if it is not in the original sealed container. This means, for example, that a case of beer that has been opened cannot be transported even if the bottles within the case are unopened.

It is an offence to take alcohol into a licensed event or into an authorized residence party.
      
6. University officials (including Event Services Staff, Campus Security and Residence Staff) have the right to search for and seize unauthorized alcohol (e.g. alcohol in an unlicensed area or in the possession of a minor). University officials also have the right to ask you to present a University student identification card. You should be aware that refusing to comply with any reasonable request of a University official is in itself an offence. For this reason it is suggested that you carry your student I.D. card at all times.
      
7. It is each student’s responsibility to have an ID card with a photo taken within the first two weeks of any year which follows a year in which the student was not a Mount Allison student.
      
8. You will not be admitted to a licensed campus event unless you present a government-issued photo I.D. that shows your age.
      
9. Ignorance of Mount Allison and New Brunswick liquor laws is not an excuse for disobeying them.