• Choose your courses and complete your registration as early as possible.
  • Attend all classes and listen to the professor. Simple but key.
  • Take good notes and review them regularly. Study over time!
  • Complete all of your assigned readings. Underline key words and take notes.
  • Try to get involved in any class discussions and ask questions if you don’t understand something. You will learn more when you engage in discussions — even as an active listener. Discuss ideas with other students outside of class as well. 
  • Treat school like a full-time job. Spend 40 hours a week attending classes, studying, and completing projects and papers. This will free up more time on the weekends when you want to have fun!
  • Use a term calendar and/or agenda to keep track of all tests, assignments, projects and exams. Schedule in social activities too!
  • Study during daylight hours in a distraction-free zone. Your bed is for sleeping, not for school work!
  • Be realistic. This isn’t high school — expectations and workload are higher, and it’s normal for grades to slip a bit at first. Be kind to yourself and use this opportunity to learn better study habits.
  • Speak with your professors — they want to help you learn. Many new students are apprehensive about approaching their professors, but will actually find that most of them are pleasant and accommodating. If you have a problem pertaining to any course, start by emailing or speaking to the professor!
  • Get to know your librarians! They will be a great resource when researching and writing essays. 
  • Meet with your academic mentor in residence. All residences have academic mentors — other students who are available to assist you with study skills, time management, organizational skills, etc., and can direct you to other resources on campus. 
  • Take advantage of the opportunity to meet with an academic advisor. 
  • Get a tutor if you need one. The academic peer tutor program recruits exceptional students from all disciplines to tutor fellow students in course content.
  • Familiarize yourself with the services, resources, and people that are available on campus. Ask for help if you need it. There is always somewhere on campus you can go for assistance. 
  • Check your Mount Allison email account frequently — this is an official means of communication from the University, and you will receive important information about exams, registration, financial deadlines, etc.