Degree Programs, Minors, Majors

 DISCIPLINARY B.A. PROGRAM
MINOR in Classical Studies is 24 credits earned as follows:

18 from Classics, Latin, or Greek; or PHIL 1601
6 from Classics, Latin, or Greek at the 3/4000 level

Students may choose a minor program with an emphasis on Ancient History, Classical Literature or Art and Archaeology 



 MINOR in Greek is 24 credits earned as follows:

18 from GREK 1001, 1101, 2001, 2101, and Greek at the 3000 level

6 from Greek, Latin, or Classics



MINOR in Latin is 24 credits earned as follows:

18 from LATI 1001, 1101, 2001, 2101, and Latin at the 3000 level

6 from Greek, Latin, or Classics



 MAJOR in Classical Studies is 60 credits earned as follows:

6 from LATI 1001, 1101, GREK 1001, 1101
3
6 from Classics, Greek, Latin, of which 24 must be from the 3/4000 level

18 from complementary courses in Arts and Letters and Humanities (or others), chosen in consultation with the Program Advisor



 HONOURS in Classical Studies is 72 credits earned as follows:

12 from LATI 1001, 1101, GREK 1001, 1101

6 from LATI 2001, 2101, GREK 2001, 2101

6 from Greek/Latin at the 3000/4000 level OR CLAS 4950/4951

48 from Classics/Greek/Latin, of which 33 must be at the 3/4000 level


 

 The following courses are being offered this year. For a full listing of Classics courses, please consult the academic calendar.

 

 
 

2018 – 2019 Courses

                                                                                                         FALL 2018

 

CLAS 1631:  Greece & Rome: The Foundations of Western Civilization
(3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
The political and social history of ancient Greece and Rome will be surveyed with a focus on the themes of Law, Politics, War, and Society. Special attention will be paid to Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. and to Rome under Caesar Augustus.
[Note: This course is cross-listed with HIST 1631 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]


CLAS 2051:  Women in Antiquity (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
Using written and material evidence, this course will explore the economic, social and political roles of women in the societies of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the development of the Western idea of the female in antiquity. Secondarily, it will introduce and explore the social theories commonly applied to the study of gender in history. [Note: This course is cross-listed with HIST 2051 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]


CLAS 2501:  Introduction to Archaeology (3 credits)
Instructor:  I. Battiloro
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
An introduction to the methods of archaeological excavation. This course aims to acquaint the student with the theory and basic techniques of archaeology. Examples showing both past and present archaeological research done in the Old and New Worlds will be used to illustrate the topics under discussion.


CLAS 3051: Health & Medicine in the Ancient World (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq:  Second-year standing and three credits from any Classics, History, or Philosophy course; or permission of the Department.
Employing both material and literary evidence, this course surveys the conditions of life and common ailments and treatments of the inhabitants of the Greek and Roman world from ca 1000 B.C.E. to ca 500 C.E.  It also examines the origins of Western medicine in Greek and Roman science, alongside its alternatives such as magic.
(Note: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3051 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.)


CLAS 3201: Greek Tragedy (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Forstall
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
A study of Greek tragic drama as it developed in Athens of the fifth century B.C.E. The course will examine (in translation) the main surviving plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.


CLAS 3631: Greek Art and Archaeology (3 credits)
Instructor:  I. Battiloro
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, FINH, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
Exclusions: CLAS 3601, 3611
This course introduces the art of the ancient Greek world - urban planning, architecture (private and public), sculpture, painting, minor arts - from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. It engages the analyzed monuments and artifacts within the political, economic, religious, intellectual, and social context in which they were created. It uses this contextual approach as a framework for a more comprehensive understanding of art and artistic movements in their diachronic development. It considers other themes such as the way we experience ancient Greek culture today, and questions about archaeological investigative practice, the antiquities trade, and cultural heritage. Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History.
 

CLAS 3991: Digital Methods in the Humanities (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Forstall
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing and three credits CLAS, HIST, or dept. permission.
An interdisciplinary course at Mount Allison designed for humanities students interested in using computational tools to expand their research toolkit and develop transferrable skills in informatics and critical thinking.


GREK 1001: Introduction to Ancient Greek I (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Forstall
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour
Exclusion: GREK 1000
An introduction to the grammar and vocabulary of ancient Greek for students with no previous knowledge of the language. Through grammatical exercises, composition, and the reading of prescribed texts, the student will develop a basic understanding of the language of classical Athens. Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun.


GREK 3001: Readings in Greek Prose (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: GREK 2101; or permission of the Department.
The translation and study of the work of one or more Greek prose authors.


LATI 1001: Introductory Latin I (3 credits)
Instructor:  I. Battiloro
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour
Exclusion:  LATI 1000
An introduction to basic Latin grammar and vocabulary for students with no previous knowledge of the language. This course is based on readings which present not only the fundamentals of Latin but also the Roman world in which it was used. Some effort is made to show the connections between Latin and modern languages (English, French, Spanish). Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun.


LATI 2001: Intermediate Latin (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: LATI 1101; or permission of the Department.
This course introduces students to the reading of unadapted passages from ancient authors. While the emphasis is on developing a fluency in reading Latin, it also reviews basic Latin grammar and presents some more advanced grammar and syntax.


LATI 3001: Readings in Latin Prose (3 credits)
Instructor: I. Battiloro
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: LATI 2101; or permission of the Department
The translation and study of the work of one or more Latin prose authors.


LATI 4001: Directed Readings in Latin (3 credits)
Instructor: I. Battiloro
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Permission of the Department is required
This course is a detailed study of one or more Latin authors. [Note 1: Permission of the Department is required. Note: LATI 4001 may be taken for credit more than once if the topic differs.


                                                                     WINTER 2019 

 
CLAS 1651:  Classic Mythology: Gods, Goddesses, and the Creation of Order (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Forstall
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
An introduction to the gods and goddesses of classical myth in the literature, art, and religion of ancient Greece and Rome. The course will examine cosmogonies and divine myths in order to shed light on the views held by the Greeks and Romans about the nature of the relationship between mortal and immortal.


CLAS 2021:  Alexander the Great (3 credits)
Instructor:  B. Robertson
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
Exclusion: CLAS/HIST 3011
An examination of the career of Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic era that followed his conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. Among the main themes included will the goals of Alexander, the new political climate of kingship and patronage that he helped create, the interaction of the Greeks with the civilizations of Egypt and the East, and the integration of new cultural ideas into Greek society.
[Note: This course is cross-listed with HIST 2021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.]


CLAS 2521: The Archaeology of Daily Life in the Greek and Roman World
(3 credits)
Instructor:  I. Battiloro
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
An examination of the evidence used by archaeologists to recreate the social history of ancient Greece and Rome. The course will consider how archaeology can shed light on such topics as the lives of men, women, and children; the home; government; the economy; the army; and entertainment.


CLAS 3211: Greek & Roman Comedy (3 credits)
Instructor:  C. Forstall
Format: Lecture 2 Hours
Prereq:  Second-year standing and three credits from any Classics or History course at the 1000 or 2000 level; or permission of the Department.
A study of Greek and Roman comic drama (in translation) as represented by the work of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence.


CLAS 3401: The Lyric Poetry of Greece and Rome (3 credits)
Instructor: C. Forstall
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department.
A study of Greek and Roman poetry that expresses universal feelings of love and fear, celebration and personal aspiration. The course will examine the themes and forms of lyric poetry, as well as the role of the poet in society. The poems of Sappho, Archilochus, Pindar, Catullus, Propertius, Ovid, and others will be read in English translation.


CLAS-3621-A (9158) Archaeology of Southern Italy
Instructor:  I. Battiloro
Format:  Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, FINH, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department.
Exclusion: 17/WI CLAS 3991 The Greeks in Southern Italy
This course surveys the art and archaeology of Magna Graecia and Sicily, the areas of Southern Italy colonized by the Greeks between the 8th and 3rd centuries BC. The course begins with an overview of the Italian cultures living in Southern Italy and Sicily during the Late Bronze Age and the Iron Age, and their interaction with contemporary Greek cultures (e.g., Mycenaeans). Most of the course focuses upon the period between the mid-8th century (when Greek colonization started) and the late 3rd century BC (when Rome colonized or otherwise dominated the region It uses a broad contextual approach, locating archaeological evidence within its historical, political, economic, and cultural context, and pays special attention to concepts such as colonization, cultural interaction, and acculturation, as well as to the differences and similarities between Greek and Roman colonization, and between ancient Greek and modern colonization. Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History.


GREK 1101: Introductory Ancient Greek II (3 credits)
Instructor:  B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour
Prereq: GREK 1001; or permission of the Department
Exclusion: GREK 1000
A continuation of the study of the ancient Greek language. This course adds new grammar and continues to build vocabulary, while concentrating on the development of a reading facility in ancient Greek. Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun.


LATI 1101: Introductory Latin II (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour
Prereq: LATI 1001; or permission of the Department.
Exclusion: LATI 1000
A continuation of the study of the Latin language. While adding new grammar, this course concentrates on reading comprehension and vocabulary building. Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun.


LATI 2101: Introductory Readings in Latin Literature (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: LATI 2001; or permission of the Department.
A reading of selected works by Latin authors. This course will acquaint the student with some of the forms of ancient prose and poetry.


LATI 3101: Readings in Latin Poetry (3 credits)
Instructor: B. Robertson
Format: Lecture 3 Hours
Prereq: LATI 2101; or permission of the Department.
The translation and study of the work of one or more Latin poets.