NORTH AMERICA

HIST 2411 (3 credits)
Canada to 1871
Lane, MWF 10.30–11.20

Exclusion: HIST 2410, 3100, 3250
This course introduces students to the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of Canada from the pre-European period to the first federal census. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

HIST 2511 (3.00 credits)
The American Experience to 1865
Naylor, MWF 9.30 – 10.20

This course introduces students to the main events, themes and issues of American history from the colonial period through the Civil War. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Distribution: Humanities-b) (Exclusion: HIST 2510, 3650)

HIST 3441 (3.00 credits)
Modern Canada
Lord, TTH 10.00 - 11.20

Prereq: Second-year standing and six credits in History at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course traces the development of political movements and ideas that are an integral part of the texture of modern Canada and that have been shaping influences on the direction and pace of social, intellectual, and economic life. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)

HIST 3511 (3.00 credits)
Colonial America in an Atlantic World
Lane,  MWF 12.30 – 1.20

Prereq: Second-year standing; 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines the history of North America from the fifteenth century to the American Revolution. It focuses on the mainland colonies within the wider context of the Atlantic world. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 3550; any version of HIST 3511 previously offered with a different title)

HIST 3531 (3.00 credits)
American Women's History
Naylor, MWF 11.30 – 12.20

Prereq: Second-year standing; 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores theoretical approaches to women's history through an examination of the role and experience of women in the United States from the Revolution to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

HIST 3901 (3.00 credits)
Historical Research and Writing Methods
Lord,  TTH 1.00 – 2.20

Prereq: Second-year standing; 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on the essential methods of historical research and writing. (Format: Lectures/Tutorial 3 Hours)

HIST 4420 (6.00 credits)
The Atlantic Provinces
Lane,  M 2.30 – 5.20

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from HIST 2411, 2421, 3401, 3411, 3431, 3441, 3481, 3491, 3511, 3801, 3811; or permission of the Department
This seminar considers key topics or themes in the history of Atlantic Canada from the pre-Contact period to the late twentieth century. Students also explore the concepts, methods, and sources used in this history, and how these and changing philosophies or theories of history have influenced the way scholars and others have researched and written about the past. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4100)


ASIA

HIST 1681 (3.00 credits)
The Uses and Abuses of History
Griffiths, TTh 10–11.20

Exclusion: HIST 1991 The Uses and Abuses of History.
This course explores the processes by which people build arguments and make decisions based, in part, on a particular understanding of the past. By a series of case studies and grounded in the practice of evidence-based reasoning it demonstrates how history is a fundamental tool in many forms of decision-making and, therefore, why history matters. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

HIST 2731 (3 credits)
Asia in World History
Griffiths, TTh 1.00–2.20

Exclusion: HIST 2700; any version of HIST 2731 previously offered with a different title.
This survey course focuses on the historical events and processes that led to the formation of modern Asia since the 19th century. Central to this story are the ways in which the peoples of this diverse region have struggled to understand, adapt to, and simultaneously re-define their understanding of what it means to be modern. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial, 3 Hours)

HIST 4001 (3.00 credits)
History Through Film
Griffiths,  M 2.30 – 5.20

Prereq: Third-year standing; 12 credits from HIST at the 2/3000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides thematic study of topics in modern history through the medium of film, both feature and documentary. It reads the films critically both as art forms and as historical documents. It places particular emphasis on what films tell us about the particular historical context in which they were created. [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History.] (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)


EUROPE


HIST 1611 (3 credits)
The Expansion of Europe Abroad
Torrance,  MWF 9.30–10.20

This course will focus on the expansion of Europe after the fifteenth century and the impact of that expansion on both Native peoples and on European civilization. Themes to be considered are the creation of a world economy, racial relations, the rise and fall of European power, the impact of technology, the growth of indigenous nationalism, and the legacy of European expansion. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

HIST 1671 (3.00 credits) 
Historical Perspectives on Women and Gender in Modern Europe     
Della Zazzera, MWF 8.30 – 9.20

This course surveys women's lives in modern Europe from the Enlightenment until the twentieth century creation of the European Union. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3361)

HIST 2001 (3.00 credits)
Europe During the Mediaeval Era
Lundell, TTH 2.30 - 3.50

This course surveys the history of mediaeval civilization from c.300 to c.1300. By investigating the changing ways the peoples of western Eurasia organized their political, social, and economic relationships and pursued, and frequently contested, ideals of learning, sacredness, and beauty, it provides an introduction to the methods historians use to construe the past, giving particular attention to the close reading and interpretation of contemporary documents. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2000; any version of HIST 2001 previously offered with a different title)

HIST 3251 (3.00 credits)
Class, Gender, and Capitalism: the Transformation of the British Social Structure 1750-1850
Torrance,  MWF 11.30 – 12.20

Prereq: Second-year standing; 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course traces the decline of the aristocracy, the triumph of the middle classes, and the making of the working class in Britain during the early stages of capitalism and industrialization. The course also examines gender relations and analyses the notion of 'separate spheres'. Particular attention is paid to the controversies among historians surrounding the nature of social transformation in Britain. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3400; any version of HIST 3251 previously offered with a different title)

HIST 3361 (3.00 credits)
Culture and Society in Modern Europe
Della Zazzera, MWF 10.30 – 11.20

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 2031, 2041 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course examines major themes and issues in Continental European social and cultural history from the seventeenth century to the present. Topics include: identity formation; class and gender; community and nation; family, work and leisure; myth and memory; popular and high culture; and the emergence of mass consumer society. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3360)

HIST 4221 (3.00 credits)
Advanced Topics in Renaissance History
Lundell, W 2.30 – 5.20

Prereq: Third-year standing; HIST 3121; 3 credits from HIST 3141, HIST 3151, HIST 3161, HIST 3611, HIST 3621, HIST 3631, RELG 3611, RELG 3621, RELG 3631; or permission of the Department
This course is a seminar in Renaissance history. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4220)

HIST 4251 (3.00 credits)
British Imperial History, 1600- Present
Torrance, TH 2.30 – 5.20

Prereq: Third-year standing; 3 credits from HIST 3211, 3221, 3231, 3241, 3251; or permission of the Department
This course treats certain key themes in British imperial history: British identity, the nature and exercise of British power, the economics of empire, the ideology of imperialism, the development of colonial nationalism, and the experience of war. It traces these themes through the various geographical components of empire: India, Africa, the Americas, and the antipodes, to invite fruitful comparison of different imperial experiences over time and place. These prompt questions whether the British Empire was the product of purposeful development or of makeshift improvisation. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)