Jacqui Wong (bottom left) with her rowing team at the University of Oxford by Melissa Lombard acqui Wong had never been to the East Coast until she set foot on Mount Allison’s campus in 1984. She chose the University for its emphasis on academics and for a tight-knit community that she felt would suit her personality. It was this decision that started her on the path to becoming Mount Allison’s 41st Rhodes Scholar. “No doubt, without coming to Mount Allison I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to study in England and, who knows, maybe not even have gone into medicine,” she says.  Wong says being awarded the Rhodes Scholarship was a huge thrill and represented not only her hard work, but that of the people at Mount Allison who supported her application. A varsity soccer and volleyball athlete at Mount Allison, Wong credits one of her greatest supporters as longtime volleyball coach and sports information officer Sue Seaborn (who Wong recently visited in Sackville, after an absence of more than 20 years, to celebrate Seaborn’s retirement.) J “She really believed in my abilities and inspired and encouraged me to apply for the Rhodes Scholarship,” Wong says. The prestigious Rhodes Scholarship also involved a family connection. Wong’s cousin, Derek Hum (’67), had been Mount Allison’s 30th Rhodes Scholar more than 15 years prior.  Wong studied experimental psychology during her time at the University of Oxford and it was there she found her passion for travel. “Oxford gave me a whole different perspective on the world,” she says. “I am fairly shy and being exposed to this experience really opened my mind and offered me the opportunity to meet people from all over the globe.” After completing her master’s degree, Wong returned to her home province of Ontario to study medicine at Queen’s. She then entered into rural family practice. She says it was her time in Sackville that really endeared her to life in a small town. “Having come from a city, I was in total culture shock at Mount Allison, but I learned the benefits of a smaller community and what I believe to be a greater quality of life,” she says. Wong now lives in Walkerton, ON and her clinic is 20 minutes away in the small town of Chelsea, ON — with a population of approximately 2,000 people. The care she provides ranges from obstetrics to emergency. She says the biggest challenge of practising in a rural area is staying informed in all the areas of treatment and care. “Because I am not specialized, I really have to know a little of everything,” she says. “But the greatest thing is that people, especially in rural areas, are appreciative of the care they receive.” “ Having come from a city, I was in total culture shock at Mount Allison, but I learned the benefits of a smaller community and what I believe to be a greater quality of life / 21