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rapy to benefit palliative care patients
at Wilfrid Laurier University and began working at The Credit
Valley Hospital in Mississauga, ON. She concurrently worked on
her Master's in music therapy at Wilfrid Laurier.
"Music therapy is the kind of career that is a calling," she says.
"You really have to be passionate about it, create opportunities for
yourself, and stick with it."
Pringle works in the areas of palliative care, hospice and cancer
care, wellness, and bereavement, as well as with children with
developmental disabilities such as autism or Down syndrome.
Pringle says music therapy offers a range of benefits for patients.
For instance, when a person hears pleasurable music, endorphins
are released in the brain that are similar to those stimulated by
medication. Improvised music can regulate the breathing of
patients with shortness of breath. Familiar music can trigger
memories and reminiscence for patients who are at the end of
their life, and grieving and difficult emotions can be expressed
through guided songwriting. Matching energy levels with the
rhythm of the music can calm active children and music can also
provide tension relief and peace for families and caretakers.
"Music therapy is for anyone. It is not for everyone," says Pringle.
"But more often than not, people are responsive to music."
She now works with The Carpenter Hospice in Burlington, ON
in wellness, residential care, and bereavement support.
"This is life-affirming work," says Pringle. "You learn to value and
cherish everything you have because you see that it can all go away
very quickly."
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You learn to value and
cherish everything you
have because you see
that it can all go away
very quickly
of music