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Featurestory
Originally from St. Catharines, ON, Yarmoshuk decided
on Mount Allison partly because it offered the unique
liberal arts environment of ivy-league U.S. schools and
partly because she wanted to experience living in another
part of Canada.
She was impressed with the scope of Mount Allison stu-
dents' experiences and a conversation over the Christmas
holidays with good friend, Chris Coy, led them to write a
book together in the summer between first and second year.
The book, A World Of Difference: Every Student's Guide To
Off-Beat Work, Travel, and Study
Opportunities
, was so successful
that a third edition came out while
she was in law school.
Yarmoshuk took courses that
were internationally orientated
and chose law schools with an
international focus. "I knew I
wanted an international career
although I didn't know quite what
that meant at the time."
After
graduation
Yarmoshuk
joined a NYC law firm where she
advised foreign governments and
companies on trade policy, regu-
latory law, and international busi-
ness. She certainly had an interna-
tional career, living and working in Asia, Central and
South America, and Europe. But when the opportunity
came to work as a legal advisor and consultant she jumped
at it. It took her from the plush-carpeted boardroom to the
dusty roads of Southern Africa.
During this period she also worked as an advisor for the
Vietnam government, helping them introduce the first
U.S. technical assistance program and transform their
planned economy into a market-driven one.
In 2003 Yarmoshuk joined an economic development
consulting firm in Washington, D.C., where she ran techni-
cal assistance programs in the developing world to improve
economic growth, trade, and investment. That can be every-
thing from helping a government increase its ability to do
negotiations, to helping those governments implement their
obligations when they sign World Trade Organization
(WTO) agreements. She faces a
variety of challenges. One of
these is how to relay complex
and technical information on
trade in a form that people will
understand. The solution was
typical of Yarmoshuk. She and a
friend from law school pro-
duced five short films on the
trade environment in Southern
Africa. The films were widely
distributed to senior officials in
the U.S. and Africa, including at
the Organization for Economic
Co-operation and Development
and the WTO.
Currently she is Chief of Party
for the United States Agency for
International Development (USAID)'s Worldwide Trade
Capacity Building Project.
"I give developing countries the tools to assess what their
interests are, to be able to formulate their position, so they
can represent their own interests."
And what's next? The one certainty is that whatever her
direction, she will be pushing the boundaries in unexpected
and creative ways.
University | 17
Yarmoshuk, centre, conducts an interview for a
series of short films on the trade environment in
Southern Africa.
(As part of the USAID)
I give developing countries the
tools to assess what their interests
are, to be able to formulate their
position, so they can represent
their own interests