background image
/ 17
B
ridget Arsenault has always wanted to be a writer.
More specifically, she wanted to write for
Vanity
Fair -- a pop culture, society, and current affairs
magazine. And now, at the age of 26, she has been
working in the U.K. office for three years.
"I never, ever forget how incredibly lucky I am," she says. "Grow-
ing up, working for
Vanity Fair was my dream job, and I never
imagined that it would actually come true."
A natural storyteller, Arsenault wrote for her high school
newspaper and then attended Mount Allison to study Eng-
lish and women's and gender studies. While at Mount Allison,
she wrote for the student newspaper, the
Argosy, had a radio
show at CHMA, and worked freelance for the CBC and
[
here] magazine.
"All of these things helped me gain confidence in the field," says
Arsenault. "And Mount A is so much about great professors. Dr.
Bamford, Dr. Brown, and Dr. Hammond-Callaghan were true
inspirations. They helped me figure out what I was good at."
Arsenault moved to London the day after she graduated from
Mount Allison to attend the creative writing program at the
University of Oxford. She spent her summer in '08 as an intern
with
Vanity Fair and then as a temp with other magazines in the
Conde Nast building, home to 16 lifestyle publications. Near the
end of her degree, a position became available at
Vanity Fair.
Arsenault is now a sub-editor and writes for
Royal Watch on
vanityfair.com. She also writes about parties, events, arts, and
society in London.
"It's lighthearted and escapist for the reader," she says. "It is chal-
lenging to think of new ways to convey the stories that have been
reported again and again."
She says her most memorable Royal moment was the Royal
wedding, even though she was not actually in London at the time.
"I was in Versailles for a close friend's wedding, but we all gathered
around a TV in the hotel to watch Kate walk down the aisle."
Growing up, Arsenault was also a serious horseback rider. She
even brought her horse with her to Sackville. She says she consid-
ered a career with horses, but her love of writing won over. Some
day she hopes to write novels and a movie.
A self-proclaimed culture junkie, Arsenault stays connected to
what is happening in London.
"I'm a good go-to person in the office for questions about the-
atre openings, exhibitions, or even new bars and restaurants," she
says. "Especially theatre, but that all goes back to writing. There's
nothing I love more than a perfectly written play or a brilliantly
executed film."
A duel Canadian-British citizen, Arsenault plans to stay in
London longterm and continue writing.
"This is a really tough industry," she says, "so I just want to keep at
it. If you stop to breathe, the industry goes on without you. There
are so many writers out there who I read and think, `Wow, I'd love
to write like that.' It is a very inspiring and aspirational job."
by Melissa Lombard
The
Royal
treatment
Bridget Arsenault ('08) writes about the Royals for Vanity Fair
Arsenault on the red carpet for Vanity Fair at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) event -- a career highlight.