Mount Allison University Campus

Academic Calendar 2021-2022

Table of Contents

Biochemistry

Biochemistry is the study of the chemical structures and processes of living organisms.

Interdisciplinary B.Sc. Programs

MINOR in Biochemistry is 24 credits earned as follows:

6from BIOC 1001, 2001
3from BIOL 1501
6from CHEM 1001, 1021
3from CHEM 2111, 2411
6from Biochemistry at the 3/4000 level

MAJOR in Biochemistry is 75 credits earned as follows:

21from BIOC 1001, 2001, 3001, 3031, 3041, 3521, 4031
3from Biochemistry at the 3/4000 level
3from BIOL 1501
9from BIOL 2101, 2201, 2301, 2401, 2701, 2811, 3111, 3211, 3631, 3711, 4151, 4211, GENS 1401
15from CHEM 1001, 1021, 2111, 2411, 3111
6from CHEM 2211, 2311, 3131 (or BIOC 3131)
3from MATH 1111 or 1151
3from MATH 1121
3from PHYS 1041 or 1051
3from PHYS 1551
6from Biochemistry or Biology or Chemistry or GENS at the 3/4000 level, of which three credits must be from BIOC or CHEM

HONOURS in Biochemistry is 84 credits earned as follows:

75credits as in the Major
9from BIOC 4990 and BIOC 4903

BIOCHEMISTRY COURSES

Note:  The listing of a course in the Calendar is not a guarantee that the course is offered every year.

Note:  Students must obtain a grade of at least C- in all courses used to fulfill prerequisite requirements. Otherwise, written permission of the appropriate Department Head or Program Co-ordinator must be obtained.

Introductory Biochemistry

This course introduces current topics and advances in Biochemistry and engages students in the scope and activities of the discipline. It examines the central role of water in biological systems, leading to an introduction of acid-base equilibria, the properties of biological membranes, and the bioenergetics of solutes moving across membranes. It introduces the principles of carbon bonding and electronegativity, leading to coverage of the bioorganic functional groups, whose characteristic properties and reactions combine to create the highly complex biological macromolecule classes of carbohydrates, proteins,nucleic acids, and lipids. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1.5 Hours)

Special Topic in Biochemistry

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for BIOC 1991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Enzymology and Metabolism

Prereq: Second-year standing; BIOC 1001; or permission of the Department
This course examines the properties of enzymes including kinetics and regulation. It introduces carbohydrate and fat metabolism, respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport, and nitrogen assimilation and dissimilation, concentrating on key stoichiometries, structures, redox biochemistry, and bioenergetics. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of BIOC 2001 previously offered with a different title)

Special Topic in Biochemistry

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for BIOC 2991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Experiential Biochemistry

Prereq: BIOC 2001; or permission of the Department
This course teaches students to plan and conduct a range of current biochemical analyses including spectroscopy, gas analyses, and chromatographic separations and imaging, with particular emphasis on the new opportunities opened through high-throughput computerized data capture applied to both established and new instrumental analyses. In parallel it guides students through the processes of plotting, interpreting, and presenting the meaning of their results. (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory, 6 Hours)

Molecular Analyses

Prereq: BIOC 2001; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on experiential analysis and computer modeling of key concepts of the molecular basis of biology, including nucleic acid structure, synthesis, and replication through template-directed polymerizations. The course builds on these key concepts to explore gene structure, expression, and engineering, leading to the wide-ranging applications of molecular biology to biology, medicine, and diagnostics. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as BIOL 3031 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline. Note 2: This course is required for students completing a Major or Honours in Biochemistry. It is open to students from other programs on a space available basis, provided that the student has met the prerequisite requirement.] (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory, 6 Hours) (Exclusion: BIOC 3021; BIOC 3531)

Nucleic Acids: Structures, Mechanisms And Regulations

Prereq: BIOC 2001; BIOL 1501; or permission of the Department
This course interlinks structural, mechanistic, and regulatory aspects of nucleic acid function. It explores the structures of DNA and RNA and how DNA assembles into chromosomes. It also reviews the mechanisms of DNA replication, repair, recombination, transcription, and RNA splicing. It examines the complexity and ingenuity of gene regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: BIOC 4911 Nucleic Acids)

Molecular Immunology

Prereq: BIOL 1501; BIOC 2001; or permission of the Department
This course explains the core molecular structures of the immune system: antibodies and their interactions with antigens. It places these molecular interactions in the context of the cells and tissues of the immune system and the signaling cascades that regulate immune responses. The course concludes with topics in immunology and applications of immunochemistry. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with BIOL 3051 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: BIOC 4011)

Organic Chemistry: Bioorganic

Prereq: CHEM 2121; or permission of the Department
This course presents the principles of organic chemistry as they apply to biochemical problems. Topics covered include enzymic reaction mechanisms, enzyme cofactors, peptide and nucleic acid synthesis, and enzymes in organic synthesis. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with CHEM 3131 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline. Chemistry students should register for CHEM 3131.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Advanced Metabolism

Prereq: BIOC 2001; or permission of the Department
This course examines the coordinated biochemical transformations of matter, energy, and information through metabolic pathways, emphasizing nitrogen, lipid, and secondary metabolism, metabolic compartmentalization and integration, and bioenergetics. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: BIOC 3501 Metabolism)

Protein Biochemistry

Prereq: BIOC 2001; or permission of the Department
This course examines the relations between protein structure and function at the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary levels; enzyme catalysis and mechanism; isolation, purification, and characterization of proteins; the metabolism of proteins through synthesis and degradation; and recent trends in protein design. Students learn sequence comparison, motif searching, and development of visual protein structures constructed from the protein structural data bases available over the web. The course introduces mass spectroscopic analyses of the proteome and protein sequencing. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 3 Hours)

Biochemical Ecology

Prereq: BIOL 2101; BIOC 2001; or permission of the Biology Department
This course deals with the biochemistry of interactions between animals, plants and microorganisms that occur in the natural environment. It places strong emphasis on the role of "secondary metabolites" or "natural products" such as alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, etc., in the insect-plant, vertebrate-plant, plant-plant and vertebrate-vertebrate relationships. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with BIOL 3711 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Special Topic in Biochemistry

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for BIOC 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Lipid and Membrane Biochemistry

Prereq: BIOC 2001; or permission of the Department
This course covers the metabolism of major classes of lipids, their roles in signal transduction, and their interactions with proteins. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Signal Transduction

Prereq: BIOC 3521; or permission of the Department
This course examines the processes by which cells receive external signals and convert this information into cellular events through ordered sequences of biochemical reactions that may result in changes to cellular metabolism, behaviour, or gene expression.(Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Virology

Prereq: Third-year standing; BIOL 2201; 3 credits from BIOL 2601, 2811, BIOC 3041; or permission of the Department
This course introduces the fundamental features of animal, bacterial, and plant viruses. It covers the biochemical genetic features of viral structure and replication, techniques used in studying viruses, the evolution of viruses, cell defences against viruses, the history of viruses as the causal agents of animal and plant disease, and current antiviral strategies. It also discusses the role of viruses as agents of evolutionary change and their use in modern molecular genetics. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with BIOL 4151 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Environmental Physiology And Biochemistry of Animals

Prereq: 3 credits from BIOC 2001, BIOL 3201, BIOL 3211; or Permission of the Department
This course in animal physiology examines the physiological and biochemical strategies animals use to survive in diverse, often stressful environments. Using primary literature from scientific journals, this course focuses on animal responses to environmental conditions such as hypoxia and anoxia, high and low temperatures, overwintering, altitude, environmental pollutants, osmotic stress, and UV radiation. [Note 1: Weekly discussion groups on recent topical papers form a major component of this course. Note 2: This course is cross-listed with BIOL 4201 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Seminar 3 hours) (Exclusion: BIOC 4201 previously offered with a different title)

Inorganic Chemistry: Bioinorganic

Prereq: CHEM 2311; CHEM 3321; or permission of the Department
This course examines the roles metals play in biochemical systems, and includes an overview of bioinorganic chemistry and a discussion of metals in medicine. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with CHEM 4351 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Current Advances in Biochemistry

Prereq: Fourth- year standing
Coreq: BIOC 4990
This is a seminar course for Honours students in Biochemistry, which critically evaluates a wide range of topics from the current literature. Students are expected to deliver seminars on topics outside their thesis areas and to present preliminary thesis results. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Independent Study in Biochemistry

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [ Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor is required. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for BIOC 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Independent Study in Biochemistry

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. (Format: Independent Study) [ Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor is required. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for BIOC 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.]

Honours Thesis

Coreq: BIOC 4903
The honours thesis is based upon a program of original student research conducted with the advice of an academic supervisor. [Note 1: Consent of supervising staff member prior to registration and permission of the Program Advisor is required.] (Format: Independent Study/Thesis)

Special Topic in Biochemistry

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for BIOC 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)