Mount Allison University Campus

Academic Calendar 2020-2021

Table of Contents

Commerce/Ron Joyce Centre for Business Studies

Note: The Minor and Major in Commerce on a B.A. program are outlined below. For a description of program requirements for completion of a B.Comm. Please see Section 11.5.

Disciplinary B.A. Programs

MINOR in Commerce is 24 credits earned as follows:

9credits from the following: COMM 1011, ECON 1001, 1011, and 3 credits from COMM 1411 or a Computer Science course
15from Commerce, including at least 6 at the 3/4000 level

MAJOR in Commerce is 60 credits earned as follows:

15from COMM 1011, 2101, 2131, 2201, 2301
3from COMM 1411 or a Computer Science course
6from Economics (not including ECON 2701)
24from Commerce with at least 21 at the 3/4000 level
12from complementary courses, chosen in consultation with the Program Advisor

Note:

  1. COMM 3411, 3501, 4141, 4501, and 4521 may be designated as Economics electives for students taking a Major, Minor or Honours in Economics.

  2. ECON 3201, 3211, 3301, 3601, 3711, 3921, 4501, 4521, 4611, 4621, 4711, 4721, 4801, 4811, 4821, 4990 and COMP 3851 are Commerce electives for students taking a Bachelor of Commerce or a Major or Minor in Commerce.

COMMERCE COURSES

Note:  The listing of a course in the Calendar is not a guarantee that the course is offered every year.

Note:  Students must obtain a grade of at least C- in all courses used to fulfill prerequisite requirements. Otherwise, written permission of the appropriate Department Head or Program Co-ordinator must be obtained.

Applications in Business Studies

Prereq or coreq: First or Second-year standing; or permission of the Department
This course introduces core elements and functions of businesses and organizations (herein, organizations) in contemporary society. It considers internal and external influences, pressures and demands on organizations to understand and critically reflect on the contexts in which they operate. It introduces different business and organizational structures, functions, and considers issues of competition and collaboration within and between businesses and stakeholder groups (including governments, sectors/industries, unions and the workforce). [Note: This course is intended for first year or second year students, or students with little prior knowledge in commerce and business studies]. This course may not count for credit toward a degree if credit has already been granted for nine or more credits from 2000 level Commerce courses] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Quantitative Analysis for Business Decision Making

Prereq or coreq: First or Second-year standing; or permission of the Department
This course introduces quantitative tools used in business decision making and the conventions and terminologies used in the application of these tools. Topics include: discounting, markups and markdowns, breakeven analysis, interest calculations, and the mathematics of finance. (Forma: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Exclusion: Commerce 1991 Quantitative Analysis for Business Decision Making)

Special Topic in Commerce

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for COMM 1991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs. (Format: Variable)

Introductory Financial Accounting I

Prereq: COMM 1011; 3 credits from COMM 1411 or a Computer Science course; ECON 1001; ECON 1011; or permission of the Department
This course introduces the accounting model and analysis of Financial Statements and the important concepts associated with them. (Format: Lecture/Problem Based Learning 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 1111)

Introductory Financial Accounting II

Prereq: COMM 2101; or permission of the Department
This course examines in greater detail the principles, practices and techniques of financial accounting first introduced in Commerce 2101. (Format: Lecture/Problem Based Learning 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 1121)

Management Accounting

Prereq: COMM 2101; or permission of the Department
An introduction to the principles and practices of management accounting, with a concentration on the decision making process. Topics include the use of accounting data in short-run and long-run decision making; managerial planning, control, and internal performance evaluation; and an introduction to variance analysis. (Format: Lecture/Problem Based Learning/Projects 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 2111)

Fundamentals of Marketing

Prereq: COMM 1011; 3 credits from COMM 1411 or a Computer Science course; ECON 1001; ECON 1011; or permission of the Department
This course stresses the meaning of products and services to the consumer recognizing that a consumer orientation is essential for effective decision making. Students have the opportunity to develop fundamental skills in analysis, report writing, and presentations.(Format: Lecture/Discussion 3 Hours)

Marketing Management

Prereq: COMM 2201; or permission of the Department
The development and implementation of marketing strategy is the primary concern of marketing management. This course covers the key elements of a marketing strategy: competitive positioning, product/service strategy, pricing strategy, distribution strategy and marketing communications strategy. Students are provided with opportunities to develop analytical, decision-making and communication skills. (Format: Case Discussion/Lecture/Projects 3 Hours)

Organizational Behaviour I

Prereq: COMM 1011; 3 credits from COMM 1411 or a Computer Science course; ECON 1001; ECON 1011; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on the micro aspects of organizational behaviour. It emphasizes human needs, motivation, perception, individual differences, personality, job design, work attitudes, performance appraisal, and stress management. The objective is to ensure that potential managers interact more effectively with subordinates, peers, and superiors in the organizational setting. (Format: Case/Discussion/Lecture 3 Hours)

Organizational Behaviour II

Prereq: COMM 2301; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on the macro aspects of organizational behaviour. Topics include group processes in the organization and their relationship to effectiveness, intergroup conflict, cooperation, leadership, communication, team dynamics, and organizational change. (Format: Case Discussion/Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 3331)

Special Topic in Commerce

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for COMM 2991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Intermediate Accounting I

Prereq: COMM 2121; or permission of the Department
This course expands basic accounting concepts learned in Commerce 2101 and 2121. It develops the general accounting theory of assets, liabilities, income, equity, and funds flow. Particular emphasis will be placed on the conceptual framework of accounting, revenue and expense recognition, asset and liability recognition, and measurement and disclosure. (Format: Case Discussion/Lecture/Problem Based Learning 3 Hours.)

Intermediate Accounting II

Prereq: COMM 3111; or permission of the Department
The following topics are discussed: shareholders' equity, dilutive securities, investments, and a series of special topics, including: corporate income taxes, pension costs, leases, and accounting changes and error analysis. (Format: Case Discussion/Lecture/Problem Based Learning 3 Hours)

Cost Accounting

Prereq: COMM 2121; COMM 2131; or permission of the Department
This course studies the principles, procedures and techniques of analysis used in cost accounting. Topics include: operating budgets, product costing, predetermined costs, planning and control, relevant costs, and variance analysis. (Format: Lecture/Problem Based Learning 3 Hours)

Taxation

Prereq: COMM 2131; or permission of the Department
The course will explore the basic principles of taxation in Canada, with emphasis on Canadian Income Tax. It stresses the effects of taxation on business decisions by individuals and corporations. (Format: Lecture/Problem Based Learning 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4111)

Introduction to Auditing

Prereq: COMM 2121; or permission of the Department
This course introduces the role of auditing in society and the ethics and standards of professional conduct expected of auditors. It develops a conceptual understanding of key decisions made by auditors when examining and reporting on financial statements. It develops an appreciation of the complex environment in comprehensive or value-for-money audit on corporations and public institutions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4151)

Consumer Behaviour

Prereq: COMM 2211; or permission of the Department
This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the consumer decision-making process of individuals and groups. It examines the role of information processing, situational influences, and the marketing environment in the selection, purchase, use, and disposal of products, services, ideas, and experiences. It considers emerging ethical and technological issues. (Format: Lecture/Application 3 Hours)

Marketing Channels of Distribution

Prereq: COMM 2211; or permission of the Department
Marketing strategy is implemented within the context of channels of distribution. This course studies distribution issues faced by manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, and specialized institutions. It emphasizes inventory issues, product assortment decisions, channel negotiations, and channel change. (Format: Case Discussion/Lecture/Projects 3 Hours)

Global Marketing

Prereq: COMM 2211; or permission of the Department
This course explores managerial aspects of marketing activities across geographic, political, and cultural boundaries. Decision analysis focuses on environmental factors, cross-cultural sensitivity, and adaptive strategies. It considers a diverse set of business structures. (Format: Lecture/Case Study 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of COMM 3251 previously offered with a different title)

Integrated Marketing Communications

Prereq: COMM 2211; or permission of the Department
This course provides a broad exposure to the promotional mix concentrating on integrated marketing communications and its key elements: advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing, and other forms of communications. Canadian advertising institutions, government legislation and industry regulations are considered in relation to social and economic concepts. Emphasis is placed on understanding the marketing communications process and its place in an organization's planning process. (Format: Lecture/Experiential Learning Projects 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4251 Integrated Marketing Communications)

Arts and Culture Marketing

Prereq: COMM 2211; or permission of the Department
This course examines the appropriate application of marketing management concepts and frameworks to arts and culture. Students gain hands-on experience with issues related to the identification and resolution of marketing problems in the arts and culture sector. [Note 1: Students enrolled in Drama. Fine Arts, or Music programs who are already doing 3/4000 level work in their own field will be admitted to this course.] (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Human Resources Management

Prereq: COMM 2311; or permission of the Department
This course examines human resource management functions in formal organizations, both public and private. Topics include human resource planning, recruitment, selection, performance appraisal and employment equity; training and development; compensation systems and the management of employee benefits; and the role of the human resource manager. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Organizational Theory

Prereq: COMM 2311; or permission of the Department
This course examines current theory and research on the design of effective organizations. It focuses on interrelationships among an organization's formal and informal structures, culture, technology, and competitive environment and the different types of organizations resulting from different configurations of these elements. Topics may include power and politics in and about the organization, goal setting, organizational effectiveness and efficiency, and organizational renewal. (Format: Case Discussion/Lecture 3 Hours)

Entrepreneurship and New Venture Creation

Prereq: COMM 2131; COMM 2201; or permission of the Department
This course examines the process of business venture creation and start-up and of the role of the entrepreneur in this process. Topics include business opportunity assessment, the structure and function of the business plan, new venture financing, and the legal and regulatory aspects of start-up. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Critical Issues in Work and Employment

Prereq: 6 credits from Social Science; or 3 credits from COMM 2311, WGST 1001; or permission of the Department
This course examines contemporary issues of differential access to decent quality work. Drawing from critical employment scholarship, this course addresses the meaning and nature of job quality; examines the consequences of poor quality work for individuals, families and society; and considers employer practices, and organizational and structural enablers of differential job/employment quality. It considers issues of precarious and 'non-standard' work, emotional and aesthetic labour, harassment in the workplace, and occupational and labour market segregation through an intersectional lens, including issues of gender, race, age, ability, class, and immigration status. [Note: This course is listed as an elective for the Minor in Women's and Gender Studies] (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Commerce 3991 Critical Issues Work & Labour Markets)

Research Methods in Business

Prereq: 3 credits from MATH 2321, ECON 2701, PSYC 2011; or permission of the Department
This course introduces students to the process of research to illuminate the academic and practical significance of research activities. Students are exposed to different research methodologies and how these underlying methodologies inform the research process. Topics include qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, developing data collection strategies and tools, and selecting appropriate methods to analyze data. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Laboratory 1 Hour) (Exclusion: COMM 4231)

Management Science

Prereq: 3 credits from MATH 1111, 1151; 3 credits from MATH 2321, ECON 2701, PSYC 2011; 3 credits from a Computer Science course; or Permission of the Department
This course examines formalized methods of arriving at business decisions. Topics may include constrained optimization models, decision models, game theory, network models, forecasting, and dynamic programming. [Note 1: Counts as an Economics elective for students taking a Major, Minor or Honours in Economics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of COMM 3411 previously offered with a different title).

Production and Operations Management

Prereq: COMM 2131; MATH 2311; or permission of the Department
An introduction to issues and problems in the area of operations management. Topics include: productivity, product design and process selection (manufacturing and services), quality control, capacity planning, facility layout, work measurement, just-in-time inventory systems, synchronized manufacturing, and automation. (Format: Lecture/Projects 3 Hours)

Management Information Systems

Prereq: COMM 2131; 3 credits from COMP; or permission of the Department
This course covers the information systems approach to the decision-making process. Such methods as Critical Path Planning, Electronic Data Processing and others will be studied in reference to a total information system. The student will be involved in identifying, evaluating, and designing information flows. (Format: Lecture/Projects 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4411)

Introduction to Finance

Prereq: COMM 2101; 3 credits from MATH 2321, ECON 2701, PSYC 2011; or permission of the Department
Important topics in this course include value, capital budgeting, the relationship of risk and expected return, market efficiency, capital structure and dividend policy. Other topics such as option theory, hedging, the theory of interest, and international finance may be introduced. The institutional setting of financial management in North America, and specifically in Canada, will be discussed. [Note 1: Counts as an Economics elective for students taking a Major, Minor or Honours in Economics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Commercial Law

Prereq: Third-year standing; or permission of the Department
An introductory course in commercial law, providing background for general business. Topics dealt with are: the essentials of a contract, general contract law, sale of goods, employment and agency, business associations, credit transactions. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4611)

Special Topic in Commerce

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for COMM 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Advanced Topics in Accountancy

Prereq: COMM 3121; or permission of the Department
This course concentrates on advanced accounting theory and relates it to the business realities. Topics may include: standard setting, partnerships, government and not-for-profit accounting, corporate liquidation and bankruptcies, and trusts and estates. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 4121; any version of COMM 4101 previously offered with a different title)

Advanced Accounting

Prereq: COMM 3121; or permission of the Department
This course provides an introduction to business combinations, consolidated financial statements, joint ventures, and accounting for transactions and operations conducted in foreign currencies. (Format: Lecture/Case studies 3 Hours) (Exclusion: any version of COMM 4131 previously offered with a different title)

Accounting Theory

Prereq: COMM 3111; COMM 3501; or permission of the Department
This course examines the historical development of accounting theory and practice with particular emphasis on the theory of income and asset valuation. Topics include the theoretical basis for past and present accounting principles and current issues and developments in accounting practice. [Note 1: Counts as an Economics elective for students taking a Major, Minor or Honours in Economics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: COMM 3141)

Marketing Strategy

Prereq: Fourth-year standing; 6 credits from the 32/4200 series; or permission of the Department
The course provides an in-depth treatment of how marketing strategy is formulated and implemented. This capstone course in the marketing major integrates knowledge obtained from other marketing courses, and selected courses such as finance, policy, and management. The focus is on strategic decisions which have a long-term impact on the organization and which are difficult and costly to reverse. The strategic decision making process is supported by an external analysis (an analysis of the organization's environment) and an internal (firm) analysis. [Note 1: This course is open only to students in the Commerce Program.] (Format: Discussion/Computer Simulation/Projects 3 Hours)

Current Challenges in Marketing

Prereq: Fourth-year standing; 6 credits from the 32/4200 series; or permission of the Department
This course addresses emerging issues in marketing decision-making. Topics may include: recent research related to buyer behaviour, marketing analytics, sustainable marketing, marketing mistakes and controversies, and social marketing approaches. (Format: Lecture/Seminar 3 Hours)

Sports Marketing

Prereq: COMM 3211: or permission of the Department
This course examines the sports marketing industry in relation to amateur sports, professional leagues, media, endorsements by athletes, corporate sponsorship, and the revenue streams associated with sport. It considers how effective marketing strategies can be created for sporting properties, and also how sport is used as a vehicle to market non-sport products. There is an emphasis on understanding and applying the conceptual and theoretical bases of sport marketing to actual sports organizations and their business strategies. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Social Media Marketing

Prereq: COMM 2211; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on strategic social media marketing decisions framed within the context of social network structures and group influence. Hands-on experience includes an exploration of data management principles and measurement of the nature and impact of social media strategies. (Format: Lecture/Experiential 3 Hours)

Arts and Culture Management

Prereq: Third-year standing in the Bachelor of Commerce or Bachelor of Arts with a Major or Minor in Commerce; or permission of the Department
This course examines unique factors that affect management decisions in the arts and culture sector, such as governance, organizational structure, community engagement, public pressure for accountability, fundraising needs and the desire of nations to develop the sector. It takes an interdisciplinary, applied approach to resolving management issues in a broad range of arts and culture organizations including art galleries, museums and performing arts programs. [Note 1: Students enrolled in Drama, Fine Arts or Music programs who are already doing 3/4000 level work in their own field will be admitted to this course.] (Format: Lecture/Case Study 3 Hours)

Strategic Management

Prereq: Fourth year standing; COMM 2201; COMM 2301; COMM 3501; or permission of the Department
This course integrates the concepts and techniques developed in prior Commerce courses through the analysis and discussion of case studies, current affairs and academic literature. It introduces the discipline and practice of strategic management and applies the concepts in a diverse range of organizational and industry settings. It encourages the development of an ability to view the organization as a whole through exploring the interdependencies between organizational functions and the environment. [Note 1: This course is open only to students in their last year of studies for a Bachelor of Commerce degree. It is not available to students enrolled in the Minor or Major in Commerce.] (Format: Lecture/Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of COMM 4311 previously offered with a different title)

Strategic Issues

Prereq: COMM 4311; or permission of the Department
This course builds upon the content covered in Comm 4311 to explore in depth pertinent issues facing organizations in the deployment of strategic management. This course examines some of these issues and explores how these issues affect an organization's ability to compete and survive. Issues that may be covered include strategy and structure,culture, strategic human resource management, sustainability, leadership and management in complex systems, creating shared value, and leveraging power and potential in organizations. (Format: Lecture/Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of COMM 4321 previously offered with a different title)

Management of Organizational Change

Prereq: COMM 3341; or permission of the Department
A study of organizational change from two perspectives: planned change and evolutionary change. In discussing planned change the focus is on the planning and implementation process for introducing innovation, restructuring, continual learning, and other types of organizational change. Topics include overcoming resistance to change and embedding the desired change. In discussing evolutionary change the focus is on the patterns of change in the cultures, structures, systems and processes in different types of organizations over extended periods of time in response to management initiatives, competitive pressures and changes in other organizational variables. (Format: Case Discussion/Lecture 3 Hours)

Business Ethics

Prereq: ECON 1001; ECON 1011; 3 credits from COMM 3501, COMM 3411; or permission of the Department
This course deals with principles and practices of business ethics, with particular reference to Canada and North America. Issues investigated may include: the question of moral and legal responsibilities of corporations, ethics in business (including the various elements of ethics programs such as codes of conduct, telephone hotlines, training, the use of ethics officers and of ethics consultants), different control styles (integrity vs compliance programs), the problems associated with the prisoner's dilemma, the existence of implicit moral theory in economics and finance, the theory of the firm and agency theory, the problem of reputation, virtue ethics, ethical investment theory and practice, and the modelling of ethical problems, mainly using game theory. (Format: Lecture 3 Hour)

Leadership in Organizations

Prereq: 3 credits from COMM 3321, 3341; or permission of the Department
This course explores the relationship between leadership and key organizational issues and examines how the construct of leadership is enacted across organizations in the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors. It explores various theories of leadership, both classic and contemporary, as well as the evolution of leadership theory over time and its application in practice. Topics include: character, values, power and influence, gender and culture, organizational relationships, decision-making and problem solving, and management of organizational change. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusions: COMM 4991 Leadership; COMM 4991 Leadership in Organizations)

People Skills in Organizations

Prereq: 3 credits from COMM 3321, 3341; or permission of the Department
This course offers a theoretical and practical approach to interpersonal skills in business. Topics may include interpersonal skills, teamwork, innovation, emotional intelligence, deep listening, real brainstorming, self-knowledge, trust, and the receipt of feedback. (Format: Case Discussion/Lecture 3 Hours) (Exlusions: COMM 4991 People Skills in Companies; COMM 4991 People Skills)

Business of Aviation

Prereq: Third year standing; or permission of the Department
This course explores a range of issues in the aviation industry in which decision making has to balance strategic and tactical thinking against moral and ethical implications under constraints of time. [Note: This course is only available to students in the Bachelor of Commerce, BA Major in Commerce or BSc Major in Aviation] (Format: Lectures, case studies, field trips, 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Commerce 4991 Business of Aviation; Commerce 4991 Aviation Management)

Occupational Health and Safety

Prereq: COMM 3321; or permission of the Department
The course focuses on prevention of illness, disease, health problems, and injuries in the work environment. Topics include: relevant legislation, occupational hazards, workplace safety climate, the etiology of job stress, and preventative health and safety interventions. The course is designed to encourage the application of psychological principles that influence employee health and safety in the workplace. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Commerce 4991 Occupational Health and Safety)

Investments and Portfolio Management

Prereq: COMM 3501; or permission of the Department
Topics include theories of security valuation, portfolio selection, stock markets and economic efficiency, and capital market equilibrium. The behaviour of prices of stocks, bonds, and money market instruments will be investigated. Derivative securities will be introduced. Problems of evaluating the investment performance of individuals and investment management institutions will be discussed. [Note 1: Counts as an Economics elective for students taking a Major, Minor or Honours in Economics.] (Format: Lecture/Field Trip 3 Hours)

Corporate Finance

Prereq: COMM 3501; or permission of the Department
Financial concepts and techniques applied to problems such as working capital management, financial planning, capital budgeting, capital structure, cost of capital, and mergers and acquisitions. [Note 1: Counts as an Economics elective for students taking a Major, Minor or Honours in Economics.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Venture Capital and Finance of Innovation

Prereq: COMM 3501; or permission of the Department
This course will provide students with an understanding of the venture capital process in the financing of innovation. The course will address the demand and supply of venture capital issues from the perspective of entrepreneurs and investors. Lectures, discussions, case studies and labs may be used to assist students in developing an understanding of the venture capital industry and explore various partnership and organizational arrangements. An important element of the course will be the application of valuation methodologies to these innovative ventures. Issues related to corporate governance will also be discussed in the course. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Independent Study in Commerce

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for COMM 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Independent Study in Commerce

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for COMM 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Honours Thesis

Prereq: Fourth-year standing
This course requires a major paper on a business topic and is carried out in close consultation with a thesis director. [Note 1: Permission of the Department is required.] (Format: Independent Study/Thesis)

Special Topic in Commerce

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. (Format: Variable) [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for COMM 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.]