Mount Allison University Campus

Academic Calendar 2020-2021

Table of Contents

Sociology

Sociology involves the study of people as they interact with one another in varied social-structural, cultural and historical contexts. Sociology provides information on the social world, introduces students to different perspectives on social life, and offers training in specific research skills. It expands our horizons, challenges us to think critically about the world around us, and prepares us to participate in that world First and second year sociology courses provide an overview of the discipline and an introduction to sociological analysis. Third year courses emphasize theoretical approaches, analytical methods, and their application to major substantive areas of sociological interest. Fourth year courses allow students to work with greater interdependence and in more depth on a range of sociological topics.

Disciplinary B.A. Programs

MINOR in Sociology is 24 credits earned as follows:

6from SOCI 1001, 1201
6from Sociology at the 2000 level
3from SOCI 3001,3011
3from SOCI 3301,3311
6from Sociology at the 3/4000 level

MAJOR in Sociology is 60 credits earned as follows:

6from SOCI 1001, 1201
6from Sociology at the 2000 level
12from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311
3from SOCI 3601, 3701, 3711, 3721, 3731, 3741, 3751, 3761, 3771, 3781, 3791
6from Sociology at the 3000 level
6from Sociology at the 4000 level
3from Sociology at the 2/3/4000 level
18from complementary courses

HONOURS in Sociology (Thesis Option) is 66 credits earned as follows:

39credits as in the first six lines of the Major, plus:
21from Sociology at the 2/3/4000 level including at least 6 at the 3/4000 level
6from SOCI 4990

HONOURS in Sociology (Course Option) is 66 credits earned as follows:

39credits as in the first six lines of the Major, plus:
27from Sociology at the 2/3/4000 level, including at least 12 at the 3/4000 level of which at least 6 must be at the 4000 level

HONOURS in Sociology (Applied Option) is 66 credits earned as follows:

39credits as in the first six lines of the Major, plus:
12from Sociology at the 2/3/4000 level
12from SOCI 3601, 3701, 3711, 3721, 3731, 3741, 3751, 3761, 3771, 3781, 3791
3from SOCI 4311, 4971

SOCIOLOGY COURSES

Note:  The listing of a course in the Calendar is not a guarantee that the course is offered every year.

Note:  Students must obtain a grade of at least C- in all courses used to fulfill prerequisite requirements. Otherwise, written permission of the appropriate Department Head or Program Co-ordinator must be obtained.

Introduction to Sociology

This course introduces the basic concepts of sociology including social structure, culture, socialization, deviance, social control, social organization, structured social inequality, and social change. It makes extensive use of examples from the Canadian context. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Sociological Imagination

Prereq: SOCI 1001; or permission of the Department
This course explores the major theoretical frameworks of sociology and the conceptual tools used to examine intersecting social relations embedded in everyday practices. It focuses on understanding how biographical characteristics are influenced by impersonal historical forces and significant structural transformations of society. The examination of sociological imagination lays the foundation for understanding how to differentiate between 'personal troubles' and 'public issues'. (Format: Lecture 3 hours)

Special Topic in Sociology

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for SOCI 1991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Social Class and Inequality

Prereq: SOCI 1201; or permission of the Department
This course is intended as an introductory examination of social inequalities and stratification in Canada based primarily on issues relating to class. This course guides students through an understanding of historic class formations in Canada to more modern analyses and understandings of class as related to neo-liberal and global economies. As well, this course looks at the intersections of class with gender, race, and disability as it relates to social inequalities and stratification. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 2991 Social Class and Inequality)

Race and Racialization

Prereq: SOCI 1201; or permision of the department
This course uses sociological perspectives to examine the social construction of "race" in historical and contemporary contexts. The course analyzes and students critically examine evidence of systemic patterns of advantage and disadvantage based on migration, racism, ethnicity, and aboriginality in national and global contexts. It explores the effects of racialization on social, political, and academic discourse as well as policy responses, resistance movements, and alternatives for reducing and eliminating racism. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Gender Relations

Prereq: SOCI 1201; or permission of the Department
This course introduces the study of gender through an examination of the nature of gender relations. It also considers major theories of the origin and consequences of gender inequality and addresses issues such as reproduction, work, law, violence, and racism with a focus on Canadian examples. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 3211)

Sociology of Youth

Prereq: Take SOCI 1201 or permision of the department
This course explores youth in relation to contexts of social structure (culture, family and peer groups), within institutions, and from local as well as global perspectives. This course looks critically at the social construction of youth in schools, families, the media, and other social institutions. It examines how socio-political factors affect youth, the agency of youth as citizens and decision-makers, and the importance of social positions such as race, sexuality, gender, nationality, and socioeconomic status. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 3991 Youth and Society)

Sociology of Sex and Sexuality

Prereq: SOCI 1201; or permission of the Department
This course examines sexual attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors from a sociological perspective, exploring how the biology of sex is sociologically constructed. It examines and explores theoretical and conceptual issues and empirical research and directs students to think about sexuality analytically and critically and to develop a sociological understanding of diverse issues. Topics include: sexual identity and its construction and regulation; sexuality and the Enlightenment; science and sex; ethics and social institutions; and the relationship between sexuality and the socio-political process. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 2991 Sociology of Sex and Sexuality)

Colonialism, Racism, and Indigeneity in Canada

Prereq: SOCI 1201; or permission of the Department
This course explores the position of Indigenous people in Canadian society by focusing on the social dimensions of race, ethnicity, and aboriginality. The course also considers the extent to which racism, patriarchy, capitalism, power, privilege, and access to resources contribute to the marginalization of Indigenous peoples and focuses particularly on socially constructed relationships that emphasize and perpetuate social inequality and stratification. (Format: Lecture 3 hours)

Youth Criminalization

Prereq: SOCI 1201; or permission of the Department
This course explores youth criminalization and youth justice from a critical sociological perspective, with particular attention to systemic issues of race, class, gender, age, and sexuality. Drawing primarily from critical criminology, the course traces the emergence and development of youth justice systems, and analyzes continuity and changes in youth justice policy and practice over time. Main topics include different correctional models such as punitive, welfare, and newer actuarial justice approaches and the criminalization of youth in the contemporary period with emphasis on the theory of intersectionality. Finally, the course examines alternative policies, practices, and attitudes intended for radical transformation of youth justice in the future. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 2991 Youth Criminalization)

Sociology of Disability

Prereq: SOCI 1201; or permission of the Department
This course explores sociocultural and political aspects of disability while paying particular attention to the ways in which disability intersects with other aspects of social life such as race, religion, sexuality, socioeconomic status, age, and gender. It explores key theoretical and methodological approaches used in the sociological study of disability and examines federal and international policy debates that address the rights and needs of people with disabilities. Course topics include: the medical model of disability, the social model of disability, feminist theories of disability, neurodiversity, activism, ableism, employment, race, eugenics, disability culture, gender, sexuality, and the representation of disability in media and popular culture. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 2991 Sociology of Disability)

Special Topic in Sociology

Prereq: SOCI 1201; or permission of the Department
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for SOCI 2991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Theoretical Foundations of Sociology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course offers a critical review of the perspectives developed in the first and second generations of sociology in Europe with special emphasis on the ideas of Auguste Comte, Herbert Spencer, Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Contemporary Sociological Theory

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides an overview of concepts, theoretical issues, and debates in recent sociological theory. It examines the nature of functionalism and conflict theory, the rise of micro-sociological analysis, the challenges of feminism, the debate over post-modernism, and other contemporary theoretical developments. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Sociology of Emotions

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course draws upon contemporary social theory on emotion, subjectivity, and power in order to analyze the emotional terrain of 'social world' and understand how power affects us. This course introduces major works in post-Foucauldian Sociology, including the work of Hochschild, Sedgewick, Ahmed and Illouz and responds to the question of how power works outside of financial or material systems. It examines the role that shame, happiness, desire, and other emotional experiences are shaped and structured by institutions such as the media, religion, and education and how, in turn, emotion comes to drive social life. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Work and Society

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores the nature and meaning of work in relation to changes in the position of professions, unions, government, women, and minority groups in industrial and post-industrial societies. It also includes consideration of topics such as the relations between work and the family, work and gender, and work and politics. While focusing on work in Canada this examination is also located in broader international trends and processes. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Quantitative Sociological Research Methods

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This is a course in sociological research methodology, including a consideration of questions of social epistemology and research design. Students gain practical experience in doing social research through the conducting of surveys, data analysis, introductory statistical procedures, content analysis, case studies, and other techniques. (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of SOCI 3301 previously offered with a different title)

Qualitative Sociological Research Method

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines the ways in which qualitative data are collected, analyzed, and used in the social sciences. Beginning with understanding the theory and theoretical debates of qualitative research, the course explores questions of definition, use, evidence, standards of rigour, and notions of what constitutes 'good' scientific evidence. The course covers a variety of theoretical orientations and explores how and when they are best applied. (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory 3 Hours)

Field Course in Sociology

This course is designed to provide students with an intensive field experience, during which they pursue research on a topic to be chosen by the Instructor. Completion of SOCI 3301 (Sociological Research Methods) is recommended before registering for this course. [Note 1: Permission of the Department is required. Note 2: This course requires attendance at a multi-day off-campus field camp and students will be liable for some field trip costs. Note 3: Students may register for SOCI 3331 more than once, provided the subject matter differs ] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Field Course)

Critical Media Analysis

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This is an advanced research course on the media-based control of information and dissemination of ideologies in modern society. It examines issues of ownership and control of the media and the social construction of news, and current theoretical debates in media analysis. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Dynamics of Popular Culture

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course investigates the processes and forms of contemporary popular culture. It introduces students to the major theoretical debates in the field of popular culture and examines the development of popular cultural expression. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Sociology of Health & Illness

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores health, illness, and health care from a sociological perspective. The course focuses on the social determinants of health, demonstrates how social structures influence the occurrence of illness, examines why some social groups suffer more sickness and disease than others, deconstructs the social construction of medical practices and medicalization, and shows how health practices are socially constructed. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Communities

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course reviews the sociological literature on rural, small-town, and urban social organization with special emphasis on the notion of "community" in Canadian society. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Education and Society

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines education as a social institution. Focusing primarily on public education at the elementary and secondary level, this course addresses the changing context of the learning environment and its relation to diverse aspects of society including class, gender, and race. This course employs various theoretical lenses to explore the social construction of public education in Canada, tracing its changing nature and purpose from its inception to more modern times. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 2531)

Citizenship, Identity & Difference

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores identity and difference in relation to national and post-national forms of citizenship. Students examine contemporary discourses of Canadian identity, immigration, diversity, multiculturalism, and belonging. The course considers what it means to be a citizen, ideas of home, access to rights for dominant and subordinate groups, the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion in the nation and globally, and struggles for recognition among ethnic minority groups. The course also analyzes social inequalities in citizenship practice, the renegotiation of citizenship rights, and the emergence of new forms of citizenship in Canada and globally. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Critical Border Studies

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores how borders are used not only to demarcate physical boundaries between nation states but also as more comprehensive political tools to maintain and reinforce multiple social boundaries and inequalities symbolically and materially. Border walls, detention centres, and the more everyday practices of passport control regulate the movement of people practically and symbolically. Importantly, borders have become essential devices for the articulation of the contemporary global order. Borders do not just nestle within the geographic domains of the nation state but are mobilized in and through international and national laws, social institutions, and culture as a means to block and at times facilitate the mobility of people, knowledge, things, and capital. Borderlands have therefore become the sites of struggle for some of the most pressing issues in the contemporary global order. Borders and borderlands are also undergoing significant transformation through globalization as cross-border and transnational experiences, identities, and solidarities form and proliferate. Borders in this sense are constantly transforming practices, evoked for particular means at particular moments, spurring resistance of various kinds. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Transformative Learning Practicum

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course is an introduction to the professional field of adult education and exposes students to the principles of transformative learning and the tools needed to put these theories into within a range of learning communities. Topics include social and cultural factors that affect learning, strategies and methods for facilitating adult learning, learning domains, learning in formal and non-formal environments, professional and lifelong learning, principles and characteristics of adult learners, and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). An applied community project will provide students with an opportunity to develop and demonstrate their skills. (Format: Lecture, 3 Hours)

Social Policy Analysis

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides the opportunity for students to apply sociological theories and perspectives to the development and analysis of social policies and programs. Social policy is the arena in which citizens, professionals, non-governmental organizations, social movements, and government address the social inequities underlying the lived realities of individuals. The course leads to an understanding of how sociology can be applied in researching, developing, analyzing, and implementing 'real world' social policies and programs. (Format: Lecture 3 hours)(Exclusion: SOCI 3991 Social Policy)

Comparative Social Policy

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides students with a comparative perspective on social welfare policies in Canada and other industrialized nations. Students examine the various ways that countries conceptualize and organize social welfare policies, especially those that have an impact on poverty, child and family well-being, and gender equality. The course emphasizes change, culture, polity, and economic forces as important factors in shaping social policies throughout the world and assesses the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of empirical and theoretical models. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 3991 Comparative Social Policy)

Non-Profit Organizations

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides students with theoretical perspectives and empirical research connected to the sociology of organizations. Students explore the history, magnitude, and trends of the non-profit sector in Canada. Topics include the dynamics of the non-profit, government, and for-profit sectors; the history of the social roles of volunteerism and non-profit organizations; the impact of non-profit organizations on society; and the changing roles of the three sectors in the twenty-first century. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 2991 Non-Profit Leadership)

Applied Social Research

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course draws on a broad range of theoretical principles in sociology and sociological research methods to analyze and recommend solutions for various social problems. Topics include establishing a research agenda and parameters, funding applied research, the relationship between goals and outcomes, measurement issues, program and evaluation processes, and client relations. A key component of the course is grant writing and communication in the professional setting. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Clinical Sociology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course introduces clinical sociology beginning with a critical examination of the ethics, values, and historical development of the profession. It provides an opportunity for students to understand the role of the human services sector in a diverse and complex society. Students learn to apply sociological analysis of power, practices, policies, and beliefs in order to develop interventions at the micro, meso, and macro levels which will improve the situation of client systems. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of SOCI 3741 previously offered with a different title.)

Service Sociology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides hands-on opportunities for students to gain practical skills and experience in service sociology, a socially responsible and mission-oriented sociology of action and alleviation, through public service, social action, and community engagement. It provides an opportunity for students to learn from experienced professionals and acquire relevant skills that can be applied in the work or voluntary sector. Students gain theoretical and methodological understanding of the interventions available for community-based engagement.(Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of SOCI 3751 previously offered with a different title.)

Community Health

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides an introduction to the study of structural inequalities that contribute to health disparities, with an emphasis on geographic, identity-based, or virtual communities as the focus for research and intervention. It also considers the social justice implications and potential effectiveness of public health policies and programs and investigates the value of participatory community interventions in prevention, health promotion, and care with individuals, families, and community members. (Format: Lecture 3 hours)

Cultural Competencies

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course enters into debates about the relevance of culture and diversity through the concept of cultural competence defined as a set of skills, values, and principles that acknowledge, respect, and work towards optimal interactions between the individual and various cultural, ethnic, and racialized groups. This course examines cultural competency from personal, experiential, historical, and organizational perspectives, with a specific focus on the recognition of diversity and inclusion within a variety of settings. Topics also include: cultural consciousness, micro-aggressions, and cross-cultural communication. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 3991 Cultural Competencies)

Program Evaluation

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides a conceptual and practical introduction to the orientation, values, methods, and professional standards of program evaluation as an applied technique to evaluate the design, implementation, effectiveness, and impact of social programs in both the for-profit and not-for-profit sectors. It involves the systematic collection and analysis of data using research methods, including but not limited to needs assessments, cost/benefit analysis, and interviews. It introduces students to program evaluation theory, principles, and technique and involves the design and execution of a case-based program evaluation. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Introduction to Restorative Justice

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This foundational course will introduce learners to an alternative approach to crime that differs from the traditional punitive approach of the legal system. Participants will explore the foundational values, goals and principles of both Restorative Practice as well as the Restorative Justice model, and how this approach may be applied in a variety of sociological settings including, but not limited to social services, nonprofits, and schools. The course explores how restorative justice practice represents a move from one of social control to one of social engagement, in terms of the response to crime. Further, the course will consider the situation in Canada as it compares to the United States and the United Kingdom in implementing reforms to the justice system based on diversionary approaches and strategies. Finally, the course reviews evidence of the cost effectiveness of restorative approaches and the effectiveness at reducing recidivism. (Format: Lecture, 3 Hours)

Environmental Sociology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course is an introduction to environmental sociology and explores the interaction between the environment and human society. Using sociological perspective, the course explores how the technologies, consumption and production patterns, population trends, status systems, racialization, class, religion and culture, among others, affect the emergence of, and reactions to, environmental problems. This course investigates how the risks and harms of environmental problems are distributed across societies to understand the relationship between social systems and environmental inequalities. This course will also explore and introduce post materialism, global environmentalism, anti-reflexivity and political polarization. Instances of global injustice, environmental racism, regulatory practices and risk, the social creation of nature, as well as ecopopularism, will also be investigated. (Format: Lecture, 3 Hours)

Digital Sociology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
Digital innovations and the internet are ubiquitous within and beyond our borders. Digital technologies (Facebook, Twitter, smart phones, etc.) have become normalized and are an integral part of many people's everyday lives. This course has four primary objectives: 1) to discuss the relevance of studying the intersection of the digital and social 2) to become familiar with different theoretical approaches to examining the effects of the internet and digital environments on society 3) to learn about contemporary uses of the internet and digital environments and 4) to learn how diverse groups experience the digital world. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to the following: security, surveillance and privacy, cyberbullying, uses of digital innovations and gratification, labour and the internet, the digital divide, bias in big data, social capital, isolation and the internet, the body in cyberspace and transhumanism, concepts of the self, including the cyborg and the posthuman, and social relationships and the web including intimacies and dating. The aim is to not only have a thorough understanding of the theories of the internet and digital environments, but also of the methodological challenges inherent in studies of the sociodigital. (Format: Integrated Lecture and Laboratory, 3 Hours)

Special Topic in Sociology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for SOCI 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Sociology of Knowledge

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on the relationship between ideas and their social and cultural contexts. It critically examines various forms of knowledge, including common sense, scientific knowledge, and feminist epistemology. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 3441)

Representations of Social Problems

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course explores contemporary social problems through the lenses of social institutions, inequality, socioeconomic status, racialization, political and economic structures, and social policy. Relying on representations depicted in television, film, music, and literature, this course analyzes causes of major problems including drug use, crime, poverty, family, youth, education, discrimination, and urban problems. (Seminar 3 Hours)

Sociology of Human Services

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course brings a critical and theoretical focus to the 'helping professions'. Drawing from contemporary social theory on institutions, power, and subjectivity, it investigates the landscape of non-governmental, governmental, and private charitable organizations within the human services. It also explores the tensions between non-governmental organizations and democracy in contemporary society and examines notions of power, welfare, and 'help' in the context of class, race, gender, medical status, and education in Canada. (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

Critical Criminology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course investigates contemporary concepts in critical criminology through examination of texts drawn from postmodern sociological theory, critical prison studies, cultural criminology, and the sociology of law. It examines the social constructions of deviance and crime and resulting practices of punishment, detention, policing, and control, and also considers the role of race, class, gender, age, and citizenship status as factors that result in a diversity of experiences with law, freedom, violence, and punishment. (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

Community-Based Participatory Research Methods

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course examines the emerging field of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) and its applications through arts-based research initiatives. This course focuses on CBPR literature that highlights the benefits of active collaborations between communities and researchers and recognizes and values the contributions of community collaborators. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 4991 Community-based Participatory Research Methods)

Political Sociology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course examines the sociological practices that lead to political authority, structures of control, and relations of power that guide and influence social life. Starting from theoretical perspectives in political sociology, this course explores domestic and international examples of social and political practices that help sustain existing conditions while at the same time providing opportunities to transform society. Understanding agency and structure as elements of political action and participation, both in large group and communal settings and small-scale and individual actions, this course explores the multi-dimensional aspects of power and control in our society. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 3501)

Social Movements

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course examines movements that seek change in the social and political structure of society. It surveys the major principles and perspectives used by sociologists to explain social movements and revolutions. It examines the origins, strategies, recruitment, consequences, decline, and renewal of various social movements and revolutions. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of SOCI 4511 previously offered with a different title)

Advanced Topics in Education

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course explores advanced issues in education as they relate to social problems. Exploring the reproductive and structural aspects of knowledge creation, this course moves toward an understanding of the contradictory elements of public education as it pertains to a post- industrial world fraught with inequalities. The course explores issues of schooling as it relates to work in institutions that are both preparatory for the workplace and places of work for teachers, administrators, and others. Lastly, this course uncovers opportunities for educational reforms that can contribute potentially to a more just society. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Refugee Studies

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course explores selected topics of the contemporary global refugee crisis and the role of Canada and international agencies in humanitarian assistance, resettlement, and return. The course addresses sociological analyses of the relationship between emergency responses and sustainable solutions to internal displacement and refugee flight. It considers, with respect to national and international refugee policies, socially significant differences among refugees according to gender, age, ethnicity, social class, country, and region of origin. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Globalization and Human Rights

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course examines selected topics of contemporary globalization in relation to transnational processes and forms. It analyzes transnational forms and practices of migration, migrant organization, community, identity, and belonging in relation to contemporary globalization. Particular attention will be paid to human rights in relation to security, migration, settlement, race, gender, age, legal status, and other bases of social inequality. The course considers implications of interrelated global flows of people, culture, goods, and capital for social relations, social structure, and social change. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Sociology of the Body

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course provides an introduction to recent sociological thinking about the body in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics include a consideration of bodies as objects of discipline, as gendered and classed constructions, and as means of expression regarding race and sexuality. It examines the body as a set of experiences and institutions while paying particular attention to that which is perceived to be 'natural' and 'normal', the assumptions underlying social understandings of bodies, and the implications of those assumptions for social change. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: SOCI 4991 Sociology of the Body)

Sociology of Power and Inequality

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course uses sociological analyses of power to understand issues of bullying, harassment, shaming, violence, abuse of authority, and consent in various social institutions including workplaces, police and military, schools and universities, and online communities. It explores sociological approaches to addressing these issues, such as conflict resolution and restorative justice perspectives. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours).

Advanced Topics in Sociology of the Life Course

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course explores the shared and varied understandings that members of Western industrialized societies have about the changes that occur between birth and death, and about the social roles and activities that are expected to occur during different times of life. It explores the ways in which individuals organize their lives, and have their lives organized in ways that are consistent with these ideas, as well as exploring changing ideas about life course development. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours).

Issues in Sociology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course involves a study of specific issues in Sociology. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Independent Study in Sociology

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for SOCI 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Independent Study in Sociology

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for SOCI 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Community Based Learning Project

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course integrates academic course work with community engagement linking sociological concepts, empirical studies, embodied knowledge, public and applied sociology, and field research with independent experience working in partnership with a community organization. This course aims to heighten students' engagement with central sociological themes and material through their experiences in community-based work. The academic course content facilitates students' ability to reflect in deep and constructive ways on their experiences working with the community. [Note 1: Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor.] (Format: Independent Study)

Honours Thesis

[Note 1: Permission of the Department is required.] (Format: Thesis)

Special Topic in Sociology

Prereq: 6 credits from SOCI 3001, 3011, 3301, 3311; or permission of the Department
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for SOCI 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)