Mount Allison University Campus

Academic Calendar 2022-2023

Table of Contents

Classics

Classical Studies is concerned primarily with the cultures of Greece and Rome and their contributions to Western civilization. It is unique among modern academic disciplines in the breadth of its approach to its subject. Classics is a field in which the specialist must be simultaneously linguist, literary critic, anthropologist, sociologist, and historian, not only of politics, but also of religion and art.

The cultures of Greece and Rome are fascinating and important in themselves, but seen in the context of their legacy the very special value that we attach to them comes to light. For many elements of our own culture - its language and literature, its social and political patterns, and its ideals - are deeply rooted in the experience and achievement of Greece and Rome.

The Department of Classics at Mount Allison offers the opportunity to study these ancient cultures through courses in history, mythology, art, archaeology, language, and literature. The history and literature of Greece and Rome can be approached either in the original languages or through courses using English translation. The study of ancient literature in translation makes it possible to gain an acquaintance with the thought and literary art of antiquity without studying Greek and Latin. But those deeply interested in the subject should bear in mind the importance of the languages themselves; the direct experience of the ancients through study of Greek and Latin, in order to be fruitful, should begin as early as possible in the university career.

The Humanities 1600 series is intended to provide an introduction to Humanities disciplines. These three-credit courses offered by the participating disciplines of Classics, History, Philosophy and Religious Studies are designed to acquaint beginning students with the methodologies typical of these disciplines and to familiarize them with the approaches taken, as well as the sorts of themes pursued and questions raised in those disciplines.

Disciplinary B.A. Programs

MINOR in Classical Studies is 24 credits earned as follows:

18from Classics, Latin, or Greek; or PHIL 1601
6from Classics, Latin, or Greek at the 3/4000 level
 Students may choose a minor program with an emphasis on Ancient History, Classical Literature or Art and Archaeology

MINOR in Greek is 24 credits earned as follows:

18from GREK 1001, 1101, 2001, 2101, and Greek at the 3000 level
6from Greek, Latin, or Classics

MINOR in Latin is 24 credits earned as follows:

18from LATI 1001, 1101, 2001, 2101, and Latin at the 3000 level
6from Greek, Latin, or Classics

MAJOR in Classical Studies is 60 credits earned as follows:

6from either LATI 1001, 1101, GREK 1001, 1101; or 6 from from the Humanities 1600 series.
36from Classics, Greek, Latin, of which 24 must be from the 3/4000 level, and may include PHIL 3000, PHIL 3011
18from complementary courses in Arts and Letters and Humanities (or others), chosen in consultation with the Program Advisor

HONOURS in Classical Studies is 72 credits earned as follows:

12from LATI 1001, 1101, GREK 1001, 1101
6from LATI 2001, 2101, GREK 2001, 2101
6from Greek/Latin at the 3000/4000 level OR CLAS 4950/4951
48from Classics/Greek/Latin, of which 33 must be at the 3/4000 level

CLASSICAL STUDIES COURSES

Note:  The listing of a course in the Calendar is not a guarantee that the course is offered every year.

Note:  Students must obtain a grade of at least C- in all courses used to fulfill prerequisite requirements. Otherwise, written permission of the appropriate Department Head or Program Co-ordinator must be obtained.

Greece and Rome: the Foundations of Western Civilization

This course surveys the political and social history of ancient Greece and Rome with a focus on the themes of Law, Politics, War, and Society. It pays particular attention to Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. and to Rome under Caesar Augustus. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 1631 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours

Classical Mythology: Gods, Goddesses, And the Creation of Order

This course introduces the gods and goddesses of classical myth in the literature, art, and religion of ancient Greece and Rome. It examines cosmogonies and divine myths in order to shed light on the views held by the Greeks and Romans about the nature of the relationship between mortal and immortal. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Special Topic in Classics

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for CLAS 1991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World

This course examines the career of Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic era that followed his conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. The main themes include the goals of Alexander, the new political climate of kingship and patronage that he helped create, the interaction of the Greeks with the civilizations of Egypt and the East, and the integration of new cultural ideas into Greek society. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 2021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: CLAS/HIST 3011)

Women in Antiquity

Using written and material evidence, this course will explore the economic, social and political roles of women in the societies of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the development of the Western idea of the female in antiquity. Secondarily, it will introduce and explore the social theories commonly applied to the study of gender in history. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 2051 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Hero's Quest: Greek and Roman Epic Poetry

This course presents the canonical works of the Greek and Roman Epic traditions: the Trojan war and the rage of Achilles, the wanderings of Odysseus, Jason's quest for the Golden Fleece, and Aeneas' search for a Roman homeland. Students read the original authors in English translation: Homer, Virgil, and Apollonius of Rhodes. The course also introduces key analytical skills necessary for research in the humanities, with a special focus on critical close reading, effective argumentation, and citation of primary sources. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Introduction to Archaeology

This course introduces the methods, basic techniques, and theory of archaeology and excavation. It uses examples of both past and present archaeological research done in the Old and New Worlds to illustrate the topics under discussion. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 2501 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.](Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

The Archaeology of Daily Life in the Greek and Roman World

An examination of the evidence used by archaeologists to recreate the social history of ancient Greece and Rome. The course will consider how archaeology can shed light on such topics as the lives of men, women, and children; the home; government; the economy; the army; and entertainment. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 2521 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.](Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

The Archaeology of Religion in the Greek and Roman World

An examination of the evidence used by archaeologists to recreate the religions of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The course will consider how archaeology reveals ancient views and practices involved in the worship of the Olympian Gods; the religions of Egypt and the Near East; Royal and Emperor cults; Mithraism and mystery cults; Judaism; and early Christianity. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 2531 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.](Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Special Topic in Classics

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for CLAS 2991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Democracy and Imperialism in Classical Greece

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
An examination of archaic and classical Greek history and civilization from the emergence of the polis to the fall of the Athenian empire. Main themes include the development of political institutions, warfare, and gender relations. Emphasis is placed on historical methods and the interpretation of ancient evidence. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3001 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Conquest and Expansion: the Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
An examination of the development of Rome from a small city-state into the leading power in the Mediterranean. Main themes include the conflict between Rome and Carthage, the conquest of the Hellenistic East, and the political and social changes in Roman society. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

The Roman Empire: Centre and Periphery

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
An examination of the history of imperial Rome from the age of Augustus to that of Constantine. Main themes include the imperial form of government, the Roman army, urban development and its impact on society, and the conflicts between Romans and other cultures. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3031 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Health and Medicine in the Ancient World

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST, PHIL; or permission of the Department
Employing both material and literary evidence, this course surveys the conditions of life and common ailments and treatments of the inhabitants of the Greek and Roman world from ca. 1000 B.C.E. to ca. 500 C.E.. It also examines the origins of Western medicine in Greek and Roman science, alongside its alternatives, such as magic. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with HIST 3051 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Greek Tragedy

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
A study of Greek tragic drama as it developed in Athens of the fifth century B.C.E. The course will examine (in translation) the main surviving plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Greek and Roman Comedy

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
A study of Greek and Roman comic drama (in translation) as represented by the work of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, and Terence. (Format: Lecture 2 Hours)

The Lyric Poetry of Greece and Rome

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
A study of Greek and Roman poetry that expresses universal feelings of love and fear, celebration and personal aspiration. The course will examine the themes and forms of lyric poetry, as well as the role of the poet in society. The poems of Sappho, Archilochus, Pindar, Catullus, Propertius, Ovid, and others will be read in English translation. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Archaeological Field Course

This course involves participation in an archaeological field project, through which students gain experience in archaeological methods such as site survey, supervised excavation, recording and interpretation of evidence, and the processing of finds. The field location varies according to the project. [Note 1: Permission of the Department is required. Note 2: This course is only available to students during the Spring/Summer term. Enrollment is limited and students should be aware of the additional costs of travel and participation fees. Note 3: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 3501 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Field Course) (Exclusion: ANTH 3321 if taken as archaeological field schools in which credit was received for excavation of material remains)

Laboratory Methods in Classical Archaeology

Coreq: CLAS 3501
This course introduces students to the laboratory methods used by Classical archaeologists in the study of materials recovered from Greek and Roman sites. The field location and nature of the remains studied vary according to the project. [Note 1: Permission of the Department is required. Note 2: This course is only available to students during the Spring/Summer term. Enrollment is limited and students should be aware of the additional costs of travel and participation fees. Note 3: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 3511 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Field Course) (Exclusion: ANTH 3321 if taken as archaeological field schools in which credit was received for laboratory analysis of material remains.)

The Archaeology of Greek Colonization of Southern Italy

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, ARTH (or FINH), HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course surveys the art and archaeology of Magna Graecia and Sicily, the areas of Southern Italy colonized by the Greeks between the 8th and 3rd centuries BC. The course begins with an overview of the Italian cultures living in Southern Italy and Sicily during the Late Bronze Age and the Iron Age, and their interaction with contemporary Greek cultures (e.g., Mycenaeans). Most of the course focuses upon the period between the mid-8th century (when Greek colonization started) and the late 3rd century BC (when Rome colonized or otherwise dominated the region). It examines urban planning, architecture (private and public), sculpture, painting, and minor arts. It uses a broad contextual approach, locating archaeological evidence within its historical, political, economic, and cultural context, and pays special attention to concepts such as colonization, cultural interaction, and acculturation, as well as to the differences and similarities between Greek and Roman colonization, and between ancient Greek and modern colonization. [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History. Note 2: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 3621 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: 17/WI CLAS 3991 The Greeks in Southern Italy)

Greek Art and Archaeology

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, ARTH (or FINH), HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course introduces the art of the ancient Greek world - urban planning, architecture (private and public), sculpture, painting, minor arts - from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. It engages the analyzed monuments and artifacts within the political, economic, religious, intellectual, and social context in which they were created. It uses this contextual approach as a framework for a more comprehensive understanding of art and artistic movements in their diachronic development. It considers other themes such as the way we experience ancient Greek culture today, and questions about archaeological investigative practice, the antiquities trade, and cultural heritage. [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History. Note 2: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 3631 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusions: CLAS 3601; CLAS 3611)

Art and Archaeology of Pompeii

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, ARTH (or FINH), HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course closely examines the archaeological remains from the city of Pompeii in the Bay of Naples: its road system, sewers, public markets, cult places, burial monuments, brothels, bathhouses, political buildings, and houses and residential areas. It pays special attention to the occupation phases of the city before the foundation of the Roman colony in 80 BC, and the impact that the Roman conquest of Pompeii had on its architectural and artistic forms. It also explores the 'hidden history' of Pompeii as a means to raise awareness about the role of material culture in giving voice to cultures and communities that have not left written sources to us. [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History. Note 2: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 3721 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Roman Art and Archaeology

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, ARTH (or FINH), HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course introduces the artistic, architectural, and archaeological monuments of the Roman world from the eighth century BC to the fifth century AD. It traces Roman art and architecture from its early origins under Etruscan influence through to the periods of the Roman Republic and Principate. It engages monuments and artifacts within their political, economic, religious, intellectual, and social context. This approach provides a framework for a more comprehensive understanding of art and artistic movements in their diachronic development. [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History. Note 2: This course is cross-listed with VMCS 3731 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusions: CLAS 3701, CLAS 3711)

Digital Methods in the Humanities

Prereq: Second-year standing, any second-year course in Arts
This course introduces the tools and methods of Digital Humanities research. It surveys recent computational work in a variety of humanities disciplines, focusing critical attention on the particular modes of thought, biases, strengths, and limitations that characterize the Digital Humanities. The course simultaneously provides hands-on instruction in basic practices for digital research. It assumes no prior computing expertise but does expect that students have some experience with research in their own field. (Format: integrated lecture and laboratory 3 Hours) (Exclusion: CLAS 3991- Digital Methods in the Humanities)

Special Topic in Classics

Prereq: 6 credits from CLAS, LATI, GREK; or Permission of the Department
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for CLAS 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Independent Study in Classics

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for CLAS 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Independent Study in Classics

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for CLAS 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Special Topic in Classics

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for CLAS 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

GREEK COURSES

Introductory Ancient Greek I

This course introduces the grammar and vocabulary of ancient Greek for students with no previous knowledge of the language. Through grammatical exercises, composition, and the reading of prescribed texts, it develops a basic understanding of the language of classical Athens. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Exclusion: GREK 1000)

Introductory Ancient Greek II

Prereq: GREK 1001; or permission of the Department
A continuation of the study of the ancient Greek language. This course adds new grammar and continues to build vocabulary, while concentrating on the development of a reading facility in ancient Greek. Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Exclusion: GREK 1000)

Special Topic in Greek

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for GREK 1991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Intermediate Greek

Prereq: GREK 1101; or permission of the Department
This course introduces students to the reading of unadapted passages from ancient authors. While the emphasis is on developing a fluency in reading Greek, it also reviews basic Greek grammar and presents some more advanced grammar and syntax. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Introductory Readings in Greek Literature

Prereq: GREK 2001; or permission of the Department
A reading of selected works by Greek authors. This course will acquaint the student with some of the forms of ancient prose and poetry. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Special Topic in Greek

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for GREK 2991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Readings in Greek Prose

Prereq: GREK 2101; or permission of the Department
The translation and study of the work of one or more Greek prose authors. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Readings in Greek Poetry

Prereq: GREK 2101; or permission of the Department
The translation and study of the work of one or more Greek poets. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Special Topic in Greek

Prereq: 6 Credits from History and first year standing;
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for GREK 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Directed Readings in Greek

This course is a detailed study of one or more Greek authors. [Note 1: Permission of the Department required. Note 2: GREK 4001 may be taken for credit more than once if the topic differs.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Independent Study in Greek

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for GREK 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Independent Study in Greek

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for GREK 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Special Topic in Greek

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for GREK 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

LATIN COURSES

Introductory Latin I

This course introduces basic Latin grammar and vocabulary for students with no previous knowledge of the language. It makes use of readings that present not only the fundamentals of Latin but also the Roman world in which it was used. Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour)(Exclusion: LATI 1000)

Introductory Latin II

Prereq: LATI 1001; or permission of the Department
A continuation of the study of the Latin language. While adding new grammar, this course concentrates on reading comprehension and vocabulary building. Three class periods per week, plus a fourth hour to be arranged after classes have begun. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours, Tutorial 1 Hour) (Exclusion: LATI 1000)

Special Topic in Latin

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisites set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for LATI 1991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Intermediate Latin

Prereq: LATI 1101; or permission of the Department
This course introduces students to the reading of unadapted passages from ancient authors. While the emphasis is on developing a fluency in reading Latin, it also reviews basic Latin grammar and presents some more advanced grammar and syntax. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Introductory Readings in Latin Literature

Prereq: LATI 2001; or permission of the Department
A reading of selected works by Latin authors. This course will acquaint the student with some of the forms of ancient prose and poetry. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Special Topic in Latin

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisites set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for LATI 2991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Readings in Latin Prose

Prereq: LATI 2101; or permission of the Department
The translation and study of the work of one or more Latin prose authors. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Readings in Latin Poetry

Prereq: LATI 2101; or permission of the Department
The translation and study of the work of one or more Latin poets. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Special Topic in Latin

Prereq: Second-year standing; 6 credits from HIST; or permission of the Department
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisites set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for LATI 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Directed Readings in Latin

This course is a detailed study of one or more Latin authors. [Note 1: Permission of the Department is required. Note 2: LATI 4001 may be taken for credit more than once if the topic differs.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Independent Study in Latin

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for LATI 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Independent Study in Latin

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for LATI 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Special Topic in Latin

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisites set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for LATI 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)