Mount Allison University Campus

Academic Calendar 2022-2023

Table of Contents

History

History is an ideal instrument of liberal education. It develops analytical and communication skills and also fosters knowledge and understanding of the institutions, ideas, groups, and individuals which have shaped the political, social, and cultural world of humankind. Though historical study encourages critical thinking, it also engenders a sensitive understanding of the past, avoiding what one historian has called "the condescension of posterity" (E. P. Thompson, Making of the English Working Class , 1963 preface). As another historian reminds us, "the past is not some remote and abstract catalogue of names and dates, but the very fabric of individual [and social] identity" (J.C.D. Clark, Our Shadowed Present , 2003 introduction).

Though it is impossible to study all significant past peoples, events, and cultures, the Mount Allison History Department offers a rich variety of both subject matter and interpretive approach through individualized programs designed to achieve both coherence and depth. Courses are regularly available at all levels in most major periods of Canadian, American, European, and Asian history. Here one can study the human experience in all its rich diversity: class and gender, wealth and poverty, faith and science, self and social identity, government and politics, and war and peace.

The skills and rigor which the study of history imparts make it an excellent preparation for many career paths: teaching, law, public administration, and politics, to name a few. More than this, with its breadth and depth, it contributes to responsible global citizenship in a free and humane world.

BASIC COURSES

The Humanities 1600 series is intended to provide an introduction to Humanities disciplines. These three-credit courses offered by the participating disciplines of Classics, History, Philosophy and Religious Studies are designed to acquaint beginning students with the methodologies typical of these disciplines and to familiarize them with the approaches taken, as well as the sorts of themes pursued and questions raised in these disciplines.

Students will normally take courses in sequential order from first through fourth years. Further information about specific courses, faculty members and special programs is available in the Department of History Handbook. Students should also be familiar with the university requirements for the B.A. degree, outlined in section 11.2 of the academic calendar.

Disciplinary B.A. Programs

MINOR in History is 24 credits earned as follows:

6from the Humanities 1600 Series
18from History above the 1600 level, including 6 from the 3/4000 level, chosen in consultation with the Program Advisor

MAJOR in History is 60 credits earned as follows:

6from the Humanities 1600 Series
12

6 each chosen from two of the following subject areas:

Note: The courses in each subject area are paired

  1. European History 2001 and 2011; or 2031 and 2041

  2. North American History 2411 and 2421; or 2511 and 2521

  3. Asia Pacific History 2721 or 2741; and 2731

21from History at the 2/3/4000 level. At least 15 of these must be at the 3/4000 level
3from History at the 4000 level
18from complementary courses in Arts and Letters, Humanities, and Social Sciences, chosen in consultation with the Program Advisor. The department recommends strongly that 6 of these credits be selected from introductory courses in a single language offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures or the Classics Department: FREN 1651, 1701, 1711 (as determined by placement); GERM 1001 and GERM 1011; JAPA 1001 and JAPA 1011; SPAN 1101 and SPAN 1111; GREK 1001 and GREK 1101; or LATI 1001 and LATI 1101. (Students may substitute intermediate or advanced language courses according to placement by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures or the Classics Department or courses in another language taken by transfer approved by the History Department).

HONOURS in History (Thesis Option) is 72 credits earned as follows:

39 from the first three lines of the major, plus:
6from language courses in a single language other than English. Students may select from the following introductory courses offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures or the Classics Department: FREN 1651, 1701, 1711 (as determined by placement); GERM 1001 and GERM 1011; JAPA 1001 and JAPA 1011; SPAN 1101 and 1111; GREK 1001 and GREK 1101; or LATI 1001 and LATI 1101. (Students may substitute intermediate or advanced language courses according to placement by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures or the Classics Department or courses in another language taken by transfer approved by the History Department).
15from History at the 3/4000 level
6from HIST 4990
6from History at the 4000 level, chosen in consultation with the Program Advisor

HONOURS in History (Course Option) is 72 credits earned as follows:

39 from the first three lines of the major, plus:
6from language courses in a single language other than English. Students may select from the following introductory courses offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures or the Classics Department: FREN 1651, 1701, 1711 (as determined by placement); GERM 1001 and GERM 1011; JAPA 1001 and JAPA 1011; SPAN 1101 and 1111; GREK 1001 and GREK 1101; or LATI 1001 and LATI 1101. (Students may substitute intermediate or advanced language courses according to placement by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures or the Classics Department or courses in another language taken by transfer approved by the History Department).
15from History at the 3/4000 level
12from History at the 4000 level, chosen in consultation with the Program Advisor

HISTORY COURSES

Note:  The listing of a course in the Calendar is not a guarantee that the course is offered every year.

Note:  Students must obtain a grade of at least C- in all courses used to fulfill prerequisite requirements. Otherwise, written permission of the appropriate Department Head or Program Co-ordinator must be obtained.

Old and New Nations in North America

This course examines themes in North American history from the sixteenth century to the 1860s, with a particular emphasis on the interaction of Indigenous, European, and West African peoples, and on the formation of the new states. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: any version of HIST 1601 previously offered with a different title)

The Expansion of Europe Abroad

This course focuses on the expansion of Europe after the fifteenth century and the impact of that expansion on both Native peoples and on European civilization. Themes include the creation of a world economy, racial relations, the rise and fall of European power, the impact of technology, the growth of indigenous nationalism,and the legacy of European expansion. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Canadian Social History: Home, Work and Play

This course examines people's lives in Canada from 1840 to the present. It combines economic structures and social experiences to document the domestic space of the home and the industrial workplace, as well as public sites of leisure and recreation, and the semi-public spaces of commerce and institutions. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)

Greece and Rome: the Foundations of Western Civilization

This course surveys the political and social history of ancient Greece and Rome with a focus on the themes of Law, Politics, War, and Society. It pays particular attention to Athens in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C.E. and to Rome under Caesar Augustus. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CLAS 1631 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Town Life in the Middle Ages

This course treats the development of town life in Europe from the late tenth century through the fifteenth century. Themes include: social and political experimentation and organization, expansion of commerce and production, religious observance and intellectual life, and female experience of town life. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

France in the Age of Revolution

This course examines the social, cultural, economic, and political forces that combined to produce the French Revolution placing particular emphasis on use of primary sources for reconstructing revolutionary experience. Themes include: society in the ancien régime, the Enlightenment, revolutionary political experimentation, war,women and revolution, and the Terror. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 3371)

Historical Perspectives on Women and Gender in Modern Europe

This course surveys women's lives in modern Europe from the Enlightenment until the twentieth century creation of the European Union. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3361)

The Uses and Abuses of History

This course explores the processes by which people build arguments and make decisions based, in part, on a particular understanding of the past. By a series of case studies and grounded in the practice of evidence-based reasoning it demonstrates how history is a fundamental tool in many forms of decision-making and, therefore, why history matters. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 1991 The Uses and Abuses of History)

American Social Movements in the 60S

This course examines the United States during the 1960s, focusing on the Civil Rights, Counter Culture, and Student and Anti-war Movements. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 1991 American Social Movements in the 60s)

Special Topic in History

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for HIST 1991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Europe During the Mediaeval Era

This course surveys the history of mediaeval civilization from c.300 to c.1300. By investigating the changing ways the peoples of western Eurasia organized their political, social, and economic relationships and pursued, and frequently contested, ideals of learning, sacredness, and beauty, it provides an introduction to the methods historians use to construe the past, giving particular attention to the close reading and interpretation of contemporary documents. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2000; any version of HIST 2001 previously offered with a different title)

Europe During the Renaissance and Reformation

This course continues HIST 2001, surveying with the same objectives the history of civilization among the peoples of western Eurasia from c.1300 to c.1600. It provides an introduction to the methods historians use to construe the past and training in the close reading and interpretation of contemporary documents. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2000; any version of HIST 2011 previously offered with a different title)

Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World

This course examines the career of Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic era that followed his conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. The main themes include the goals of Alexander, the new political climate of kingship and patronage that he helped create, the interaction of the Greeks with the civilizations of Egypt and the East, and the integration of new cultural ideas into Greek society. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CLAS 2021 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.](Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST/CLAS 3011)

The History of Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800

This course surveys the history of Early Modern Europe between 1500 and 1800. It examines the social, cultural, economic, and political developments from the period of the Reformation to the Napoleonic era. Themes include: religious conflict, rural life, capital accumulation, the Enlightenment, absolutism, imperial expansion, war, and revolution. It emphasizes the study of history through an introduction to the methods, theories, and concepts that historians use to represent and interpret the past. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2010, HIST 2500)

Europe in the Nineteenth Century

This course provides a comprehensive survey of the'long nineteenth century' from 1789 to 1914. Themes include: revolution, war, intellectual and artistic developments, national unification, social conflict, and imperial rivalry and expansion. It emphasizes thinking about history through an examination of theoretical approaches and the interpretation of primary sources. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2010, HIST 2500)

Women in Antiquity

Using written and material evidence, this course will explore the economic, social and political roles of women in the societies of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the development of the Western idea of the female in antiquity. Secondarily, it will introduce and explore the social theories commonly applied to the study of gender in history. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CLAS 2051 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Canada to 1871

This course introduces students to the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of Canada from the pre-European period to the first federal census. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2410, 3100, 3250)

Canada After 1871

This course examines the socio-economic, political, and cultural life of Canada from the time of the first federal census in 1871 to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2410, 3100, 3250)

The American Experience to 1865

This course introduces students to the main events, themes and issues of American history from the colonial period through the Civil War. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2510, 3650)

The American Experience After 1865

Prereq: HIST 2511; or permission of the Department
This course introduces students to the main events, themes and issues of American history from the Civil War to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2510, 3650)

Asia in World History

This survey course focuses on the historical events and processes that led to the formation of modern Asia since the nineteenth century. Central to this story are the ways in which the peoples of this diverse region have struggled to understand, adapt to, and simultaneously re-define their understanding of what it means to be modern. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial, 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2700; any version of HIST 2731 previously offered with a different title)

Asia, the World, and Big History

This course introduces the concept 'Big History', the history of the universe since the beginning of time, to place the human experience in the broadest possible context. Moving from the big to the small, the course explores general patterns of human history such as migration and exchange, ending with a survey of historical trends in Asia over the past two thousand years. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial, 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 2721)

Indigenous Canada: a Historical Survey

Prereq: 3 credits from CANA 1001, 1011, INDG 1001; or permission of the Program Director
This course explores the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada with a focus on the processes of colonialism, resistance, resurgence, and survivance. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with CANA 2801 and INDG 2801 and may therefore count as three credits in any of hte three disciplines.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Special Topic in History

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for HIST 2991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

Democracy and Imperialism in Classical Greece

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
An examination of archaic and classical Greek history and civilization from the emergence of the polis to the fall of the Athenian empire. Main themes include the development of political institutions, warfare, and gender relations. Emphasis is placed on historical methods and the interpretation of ancient evidence. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CLAS 3001 and may therefore count for three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Conquest and Expansion: the Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
An examination of the development of Rome from a small city-state into the leading power in the Mediterranean. Main themes include the conflict between Rome and Carthage, the conquest of the Hellenistic East, and the political and social changes in Roman society. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CLAS 3021 and may therefore count for three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

The Roman Empire: Centre and Periphery

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
An examination of the history of imperial Rome from the age of Augustus to that of Constantine. Main themes include the imperial form of government, the Roman army, urban development and its impact on society, and the conflicts between Romans and other cultures. There will be an emphasis on the analysis and interpretation of primary sources in translation. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CLAS 3031 and may therefore count for three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Health and Medicine in the Ancient World

Prereq: Second-year standing; 3 credits from CLAS, HIST, PHIL; or permission of the Department
Employing both material and literary evidence, this course surveys the conditions of life and common ailments and treatments of the inhabitants of the Greek and Roman world from ca. 1000 BC.E. to ca. 500 C.E.. It also examines the origins of Western medicine in Greek and Roman science, alongside its alternatives, such as magic. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as CLAS 3051 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

The Renaissance in Italy and Beyond

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; HIST 2011 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course treats the remarkable cultural flowering that began during the mid-thirteenth century in the politically and socially volatile city-states of northern Italy before spreading during the fifteenth century to the courts, city halls, print-shops, monasteries, and schools of northern Europe. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3110; any version of HIST 3121 previously offered with a different title)

Early Mediaeval Europe

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; HIST 2001 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course treats the history of Europe from the disintegration of Roman imperial authority in the fifth century to the collapse of the Carolingian empire in the course of the ninth and early tenth centuries. Themes include: the establishment of Germanic 'successor' kingdoms, development of the papacy, missionary activities to Christianize pagan peoples, and the reigns of Charlemagne and his descendants. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3050; HIST 3141 Celtic and Germanic Europe to the Age of Charlemagne)

Europe in the High Middle Ages

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; HIST 2001 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course treats the history of Europe from the tenth through the mid-fourteenth centuries. Themes include: success and failure in the development of national monarchies, the growth of papal authority and prestige, new forms of religious expression and practice, university life and scholarship, and the calamities of the fourteenth century. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3050; HIST 3151 Europe in the Age of Chivalry)

The Crusades

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; HIST 2001 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course treats the European crusading movement from the eleventh through the fifteenth centuries, examining not only familiar expeditions to Palestine but also the use of crusades to sanction conquest and colonization along mediaeval European frontiers in Spain and northeastern Europe and to combat religious and political challenges to papal authority. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Revolution and Stability: Politics and Society in Early Modern Britain 1603-1820

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 1601, 2011, 2031 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course explores the ideological and socio-economic roots of the seventeenth century constitutional struggles that established the sovereignty of Parliament in Stuart Britain, and it traces the re-establishment of social and political stability from the Glorious Revolution through the Hanoverian Period. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3400)

Modern Britain

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 2041, 3211, 3251 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course traces the development of those institutions, movements, and ideas that are an integral part of the texture of modern Britain, and that have been shaping influences on the direction and pace of social, intellectual, economic, and political growth. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Pax Britannica: Britain's Global Hegemony, 1650-1885

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 1601, 1611, 2031 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course examines Britain's rise to world power from the mid-seventeenth to the late nineteenth century with special reference to foreign policy, naval supremacy, international economic influence, and the acquisition of empire, together with its impact on both governors and governed. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: Any version of HIST 3231 previously offered with a different title)

Imperial Sunset: Britain's Retreat From World Power 1885 to the Present

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 2041, 2721, 2731, 3231 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course analyses Britain's decline as a world power, its replacement in that role by the United States, its relations with the emerging nation states of the Third World, and its uneasy participation in the European Community. Topics include: interwar development policies for Africa, Indian nationalism, World War II and the decolonization of Asia and Africa, the 'special relationship' with the USA, the evolution of the European Community, and continued underdevelopment in the Third World. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: Any version of HIST 3241 previously offered with a different title)

Class, Gender, and Capitalism: the Transformation of the British Social Structure 1750-1850

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course traces the decline of the aristocracy, the triumph of the middle classes, and the making of the working class in Britain during the early stages of capitalism and industrialization. The course also examines gender relations and analyses the notion of 'separate spheres'. It pays particular attention to the controversies among historians surrounding the nature of social transformation in Britain. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3400; any version of HIST 3251 previously offered with a different title)

Europe in the Twentieth Century, 1900-1945

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; HIST 2041 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course examines the major political, social, cultural and economic developments in Europe from the beginning of the century to the end of World War II. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3390)

Europe Since 1945

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; HIST 2041 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course examines the major political, social, cultural and economic developments in Europe from the post-war era of reconstruction to the foundation of the European Union. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3390)

War and Society in Europe From the Late Middle Ages to Napoleon (1400-1815)

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 1611, 1661, 2011, 2031, 3161 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course examines the interrelationship between war and society from the late mediaeval period until the Congress of Vienna, which ended the Napoleonic Wars. Topics include: the gunpowder revolution, the rise of states, power and the pursuit of wealth, revolution and war, the social effects of warfare, transformations in strategy and tactics, and the changing justifications for war. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3600, 3380)

War and Society in Europe From Napoleon to Nuremberg (1815-1945)

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 1661, 2041, 3301, 3321 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course examines the interrelationship between war and society from the Congress of Vienna, which ended the Napoleonic Wars, to the conclusion of the Second World War. Topics include: technology and war; the military implications of industrial competition; nationalism, state-building, and warfare; the First World War; and the Second World War and its immediate aftermath. In addition to the social effects of war, the course also examines peacemaking and changing ethical views towards warfare. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3600, 3380)

Culture and Society in Modern Europe

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 2031, 2041 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course examines major themes and issues in Continental European social and cultural history from the seventeenth century to the present. Topics include: identity formation; class and gender; community and nation; family, work and leisure; myth and memory; popular and high culture; and the emergence of mass consumer society. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3360)

Fascism in Europe 1890-1945

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; HIST 2041 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course undertakes a comparative analysis of the origins, theory and nature of fascism in France, Italy and Germany from about 1890 to 1945.(Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

The Atlantic Region

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course surveys the political, socio-economic, cultural, and environmental history of Canada's Atlantic region from the eighteenth century to the 1990s. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3420, 3451, any version of HIST 3401 previously offered with a different title)

New France

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines the expansion of the French empire in North America with particular emphasis on Indigenous peoples prior to and following European contact and the socio-economic and cultural life of the French colonies. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)(Exclusion: Any version of HIST 3411 previously offered with a different title)

Quebec From Confederation to the Sovereignty Movement

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines the political, religious, economic, and cultural development of Quebec since Confederation with particular emphasis on the growth of nationalism and the emergence of the sovereignty movement. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)(Exclusion: Any version of HIST 3431 previously offered with a different title)

Modern Canada

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course traces the development of political movements and ideas that are an integral part of the texture of modern Canada and that have been shaping influences on the direction and pace of social, intellectual, and economic life. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)

Canada and Asia

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines Canada's relationship with the peoples and nations of Asia through four inter-related themes: immigration, missionary activity, diplomacy and foreign policy, and trade. It pays particular attention to East and South Asia and how interactions with these regions have affected contemporary Canadian society. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)

Canadian Women in Historical Perspective

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course draws upon both historical and theoretical perspectives to examine the diverse experiences, conditions and roles of women in Canada from Pre-confederation to the late twentieth century. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Religious and Spiritual Traditions in Canada

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST, RELG at the 1/2000 level; or permission the Department
This course surveys the history of early religious and spiritual traditions in Canada from before the early global era to the mid twentieth century. It focuses on Indigenous, Christian, and Jewish traditions, but others are also included. Topics include influential individuals, writings, and institutions in relation to the state and public life, as well as newer themes from cultural and social history. [Note: This course is cross-listed as RELG 3481 and may therefore count as 3 credits in either discipline](Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of HIST/RELG 3481 previously offered with a different title)

Immigration in Canadian History

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores the history of immigration to the lands which became Canada, from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, and in the context of world migration history. In addition to gender and class, key themes include: the impact of immigration on host societies, the changing roles of institutions and the state with regard to immigrants and refugees, and the construction of identities based on ethnicity or nationality. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Colonial America in an Atlantic World

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines the history of North America and the Caribbean from the fifteenth century to the American Revolution within the wider context of the Atlantic world. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 3550; any version of HIST 3511 previously offered with a different title)

American Women's History

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores theoretical approaches to women's history through an examination of the role and experience of women in the United States from the Revolution to the present. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Challenges to American Modernity: the United States During the 1920S and 1930S

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines selected crises and challenges that shaped American public life during the 1920s and 1930s: the 'first generation gap'; the Second Ku Klux Klan and other ultra-conservative reactions to modernity; aspects of popular culture, especially music; the Dust Bowl; the Great Depression and responses it evoked; and the development of industrial unionism. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 3520; HIST 3521; HIST 3991A-US during the 20s and 30s if taken in Winter 2011 or Winter 2012)

Christianity in Roman Empire

Prereq: 3 credits from RELG 2801, 2821, 3601; 3 credits from RELG 1600 series; or third or fourth year History Major; or permission of the Department
This course examines the crucial, defining crises of the ancient Christian communities in the social, political, and cultural context of Late Antiquity (roughly, 2nd to 6th centuries CE/AD). It analyzes early Christianity as a social movement, as a religious movement with a developing belief system, and as an historical phenomenon embedded within historical events and processes. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as RELG 3611 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.] (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

The Construction of Christendom: the History of Christianity During the Mediaeval Era

Prereq: 3 credits from HIST 2001, HIST 2011, RELG 2801, RELG 2821, RELG 2831, RELG 2841; 3 credits from HIST, RELG at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course traces the history of Christianity, emphasizing the Roman communion, from the fifth to the mid-fifteenth century. It investigates the development of the institutional church; the evolution of forms of devotional observance, manifested in art and architecture, literature, and the liturgy; and the varied expressions of criticism and dissent aimed at the doctrinal teaching and conduct of clergy. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as RELG 3621 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.](Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST/RELG 3620; any version of HIST 3621 previously offered with a different title)

The Fracturing of Christendom: the Reformation Era

Prereq: 3 credits from HIST 2001, HIST 2011, HIST 2031, RELG 2801, RELG 2821, RELG 2831, RELG 2841; 3 credits from HIST, RELG at the 2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course treats the history of Christianity during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, an era when the unity of mediaeval western Christendom was driven by series of reformations; Protestant, Radical, and Catholic. It investigates the ecclesiastical, intellectual, political, and social circumstances and consequences of dramatic religious change. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed as RELG 3631 and may therefore count as three credits in either discipline.](Format: Lecture 3 Hours) (Exclusion: HIST 3131)

The Confucian World

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 2731, 2741 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course examines the various schools of Confucianism that have dominated the philosophy, social relations, and political economy of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam for thousands of years. It focuses on some of the core texts of the Confucian canon and their reinterpretation during the twelfth-century emergence of Neo-Confucianism. It also pays particular attention to the Confucian legacy in the modern, industrialized states of East Asia. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Japan and the Making of Modern Asia

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; 3 credits from HIST 2731, 2741 recommended; or permission of the Department
This course examines the modern history of Asia, centering on Japan and its interactions with China, Korea, and the Euro-American powers. It considers particularly how the peoples of this region initiated and responded to radical social, political, and economic change. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST/POLS 3731, HIST 3751; any version of HIST 3761 previously offered with a different title)

Birth to Death: Life Course and Family History

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course explores the cultural and demographic history of individuals, families, and stages of the life course, from infancy to the experience of death and dying. Life course and family history thus overlaps with gender history, the history of medicine, and legal history. Topics include: sexuality and sexual orientation, education, and old age. It focuses on North America from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, but also draws comparisons to Western European patterns, and is situated in the context of world population history. (Format: Lecture 3 Hours)

Canadian Working-Class and Labour History

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on everyday working-class resistance manifested through labour organizations and political movements. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)

The Indian Act: Law, Policy, and First Nations

Prereq: INDG 1001 and 3 credits from INDG at the 2000 level; or 6 credits from CANA 1001, 1011, and 3 credits from CANA at the 2000 level; or 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; CANA/HIST/INDG 2801 recommended; or permission of the Program Director
This course will focus on the origins, evolution, and contemporaneity of Canada's Indian Act and policies. Emphasis will be placed on First Nations resistance and survivance and efforts to overturn these colonial acts and policies through time. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with CANA 3821 and INDG 3821 and may therefore count as three credits in any of the three disciplines.] (Format: Lecture 3 hours)

Indigenous Canada: Hist. Perspectives Canadian First Peoples

Prereq: INDG 1001 and 3 credits from INDG at the 2000 level; or 6 credits from CANA 1001, 1011, and 3 credits from CANA at the 2000 level; or 6 credits from HIST at the 2000 level; CANA/HIST/INDG 2801 recommended; or permission of the Program Director
This course will focus on the history of Indigenous people in Canada with a focus on the debates within Indigenous history surrounding events, peoples, memory, de/colonialism, resurgence, survivance, and re-storying. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with CANA 3831 and INDG 3831 and may therefore count as three credits in any of the three disciplines.] (Format: Lecture 3 hours)

Borderlands

Prereq: 6 credits from CANA, HIST, INDG at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Program Director
This course explores Indigenous and Settler interactions, resistance, resurgence, and survivance along and amidst frontiers, borders, and borderlands. [Note 1: This course is cross-listed with CANA 3841 and INDG 3841 and may therefore count as three credits in any of the three disciplines.] (Format: Seminar 3 hours)

History, Museums, and Material Culture

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course examines the value of material culture, objects from the past, as sources useful in historical enquiry and representation. It examines how historians use things as an integral form of evidence to open up new ways of historical thinking. It gives special consideration to the historical development of museums, with their collections of artefacts and 'stuff', that function as sites for the practice and representation of public history and heritage preservation. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)

Historical Research and Writing Methods

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on the essential methods of historical research and writing. (Format: Lectures/Tutorial 3 Hours)

The Presence of the Past: an Introduction to Public History 1603-1820

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course introduces students to the study and practice of Public History. The first part of the course focuses on how and for what purposes the past is represented for popular audiences or packaged for popular consumption in modern nation states. The second part explores Public History as a profession, through forms of experiential and community-engaged learning, such as workshops, field trips, and visiting speakers. Students will gain direct 'hands-on' experience of current professional practices by working, individually or collaboratively, on a major public history project. (Format: Lecture/Tutorial 3 Hours)

Special Topic in History

Prereq: 6 credits from HIST at the 1/2000 level; or permission of the Department
This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for HIST 3991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

History Through Film

Prereq: Third-year standing; 12 credits from HIST at the 2/3000 level; or permission of the Department
This course provides thematic study of topics in modern history through the medium of film, both feature and documentary. It reads the films critically both as art forms and as historical documents. It places particular emphasis on what films tell us about the particular historical context in which they were created. [Note 1: This course may count as 3 credits in Art History.] (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Advanced Topics in Early Mediaeval History

Prereq: Third-year standing; HIST 3141; 3 credits from HIST 3121, HIST 3151, HIST 3161, HIST 3611, HIST 3621, HIST 3631, RELG 3611, RELG 3621, RELG 3631; or permission of the Department
This course examines European history, ca. 300 to ca. 1100. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4110)

Advanced Topics in Late Mediaeval History

Prereq: Third-year standing; HIST 3151; 3 credits from HIST 3121, 3141, 3161, 3611, 3621, 3631, RELG 3611, 3621, 3631; or permission of the Department
This course examines European history, ca. 1100 to ca. 1500. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4110)

Advanced Topics in Renaissance History

Prereq: Third-year standing; HIST 3121; 3 credits from HIST 3141, 3151, 3161, 3611, 3621, 3631, RELG 3611, 3621, 3631; or permission of the Department
This course is a seminar in Renaissance history. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4220)

Advanced Topics in Reformation History

Prereq: Third-year standing; 3 credits from HIST 3121, 3141, 3151, 3161, 3611, 3621, 3631, RELG 3611, 3621, 3631; or permission of the Department
This course is a seminar in Reformation history. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4220)

Britain, 1603-1815

Prereq: Third-year standing; 3 credits from HIST 3211, 3221, 3231, 3241, 3251; or permission of the Department
This course examines revolution and stability in the seventeenth century, the expansion of trade and finance in the eighteenth century, and the frequent presence of war throughout the early Modern period. Major themes include religious controversy, social change, state building, economic expansion, and the conduct of war and diplomacy. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

British Imperial History, 1600- Present

Prereq: Third-year standing; 3 credits from HIST 3211, 3221, 3231, 3241, 3251; or permission of the Department
This course treats certain key themes in British imperial history: British identity, the nature and exercise of British power, the economics of empire, the ideology of imperialism, the development of colonial nationalism, and the experience of war. It traces these themes through the various geographical components of empire: India, Africa, the Americas, and the antipodes, to invite fruitful comparison of different imperial experiences over time and place. These prompt questions whether the British Empire was the product of purposeful development or of makeshift improvisation. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Nineteenth-Century British History

Prereq: Third-year standing; 3 credits from HIST 3211, 3221, 3231, 3241, 3251; or permission of the Department
This course explores the following topics, among others: liberalism, economic growth, political reform, Victorianism, class and gender relations, religious and cultural issues, and Britain in the world. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Twentieth-Century British History

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from HIST 3211, 3221, 3231, 3241, 3251, POLS 3200; or permission of the Department
This course examines Britain's domestic history as well as its imperial and international relations from 1900 to the present. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4600; HIST 4250)

The Birth of the Modern Age

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from HIST 3301, 3311, 3361, 3371, 3381; or permission of the Department
This senior seminar explores some of the profound social, cultural, political and economic changes that transformed European life during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Topics vary from year to year. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Topics in Environmental History

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from HIST at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This seminar examines selected topics of environmental history with a focus on Europe from the fifteenth century to the present. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Canadian Urban History

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from HIST at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This seminar considers selected topics of urban history with a focus on Canadian cities from the nineteenth century to the present. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

The Atlantic Provinces

Prereq: Take HIST-4420F
This seminar considers key topics or themes in the history of Atlantic Canada from the pre-Contact period to the late twentieth century. Students also explore the concepts, methods, and sources used in this history, and how these and changing philosophies or theories of history have influenced the way scholars and others have researched and written about the past. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4100)

Modern Canadian History

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from HIST 2411, 2421, 3441, 3491, 3801, 3811, CANA 3301, 3401; or permission of the Department
This course investigates selected topics in Modern Canadian History from the nineteenth century to the present. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4440)

Advanced Seminar on Modern Canadian Women's History

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from HIST, CANA at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on Canadian women's activism in social and political movements - from suffrage in the late nineteenth century until the second-wave of feminist protest in the 1960's. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)(Exclusion: HIST 4951 Canadian Women's History)

The American West

Prereq: Third-year standing; 6 credits from HIST 2511, 2521, 3501, 3511, 3521, 3531, 3561; or permission of the Department
This course examines the history of the American West during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It juxtaposes the real West to the mythic West and emphasizes the importance of each in American society and culture. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

History of the Modern American Women's Movement

Prereq: Third-year standing; HIST 3531; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on the history of the modern American women's movement, beginning with a brief examination of the history of feminism in the pre-World War II United States and continuing through to an examination of responses and backlashes to the women's movement. Emphasis is given to the revolutionary character of that movement and the experience of American women as influenced by the movement. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Asia in War and Revolution

Prereq: Third-year standing; 9 credits from HIST at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This seminar examines the impact of war and revolution on the cultures, economies, and systems of governance in modern Asia. Particular attention is also paid to the relationship between war and remembrance and the ways in which memories of war have been constructed and mobilized for political and ideological purposes. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Archives and Research Methods

Prereq: Third-year standing; 3 credits in History at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This course focuses on advanced historical methods, issues in archival studies, and the development of a research project using local archives. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours) (Exclusion: Any version of HIST 4901 previously offered with a different title)

Writing History

Prereq: Third-year standing; 9 credits from HIST at the 3000 level; or permission of the Department
This seminar provides students the opportunity to critically engage the major works of history throughout the ages from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. In addition to examining the ideas and theories that have animated the writing of history, students will also evaluate the importance and relevance of history to our contemporary world, its relationship to the past, and its utility as a guide to present and future action. Content varies depending on the instructor. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Advanced Seminar in Public History

Prereq: 3 credits from HIST 3921, 3861, 4001, 4901, CANA 3231; or permission of the Department
This course builds on the introductory course in Public History to explore specific topics at a more advanced level and to collaborate more directly with local or regional public institutions. Students will learn more about the theoretical foundations and debates within public history, including the study of historical memory and both tangible and intangible cultural heritage. (Format: Seminar 3 Hours)

Independent Study in History

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for HIST 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Independent Study in History

This course permits senior students, under the direction of faculty members, to pursue their interest in areas not covered, or not covered in depth, by other courses through a program of independent study. [Note 1: Permission of the Department/Program Advisor. Students must obtain consent of an instructor who is willing to be a supervisor and must register for the course prior to the last day for change of registration in the term during which the course is being taken. Note 2: A program on Independent Study cannot duplicate subject matter covered through regular course offerings. Note 3: Students may register for HIST 4950/51 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Independent Study)

Honours Thesis

Independent research and study under direction of a member of the department; for students in History Honours program. [Note 1: Consent of supervising staff member prior to registration and permission of the Program Advisor is required.] (Format: Independent Study/Thesis)

Special Topic in History

This course either focuses on topics not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program or offers the opportunity to pilot a course that is being considered for inclusion in the regular program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2: When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for HIST 4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)