Mount Allison University Campus

Academic Calendar 2022-2023

Table of Contents

11 Academic Programs

This section provides complete outlines of the specific requirements for all degrees and/or certificates, as well as information regarding pre-professional requirements. Students completing a B.Comm., B.Mus. or B.F.A. will find all of their overall degree requirements plus an outline of specific courses required in this section. Students completing B.A. or B.Sc. Minors, Majors or Honours programs should consult the overall degree requirements outlined in this section plus the more specific Minor, Major and Honours requirements listed per program in the Programs/Courses of Instruction section which follows. Those students planning further study in Medicine, Law, Dentistry and other professional programs should consult the information regarding pre-professional requirements at the end of this section and the calendars of professional schools.

11.0 Course Numbering and Credit Values
11.1 General Regulations
11.2 Bachelor of Arts Degree
11.3 Bachelor of Science Degree
11.4 Master of Science Degree
11.5 Bachelor of Commerce Degree
11.6 Bachelor of Music Degree
11.7 Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree
11.8 Bachelor of Arts and Science Degree
11.9 Certificate of Bilingualism
11.10 Certificate Programs
11.11 Pre-Professional Requirements
11.12 International Programs

11.0 Course Numbering and Credit Values

Each course is identified by a four-digit number, and carries a certain credit value.

The first digit indicates the year in which the course is normally taken.

The second digit sometimes indicates a stream or category of courses within one department.

The third digit specifies a particular course within the department.

The fourth digit indicates the credit value of the course. A 6 credit course extends through Fall and Winter terms and has a fourth digit of zero, with the exception of MSCI 5990 which extends through multiple terms and has no credit value; a 3 credit course usually lasts one term only and has a fourth digit of one. A few 3 credit courses extend through the Fall and Winter terms and have a fourth digit of three. One credit courses have a fourth digit of nine and extend throughout both Fall and Winter terms.

Note:  Both Fall and Winter terms must be completed to obtain credit for full year courses.

Requirements for degree programs are stated in terms of such course numbers and their accumulated credit values. Typically, a degree requires a minimum 120 credits, earned by passing some combination of 6 credit (two term) and 3 credit (one term) courses. A typical Major requires 60 credits; a typical Minor requires 24 credits.

Note:  A grade of D (D+, D, D-) in any course will be considered a conditional (non-continuing) pass. In order for a course to be used to fulfill prerequisite requirements, a grade of C- or better must be obtained. Otherwise, written permission of the appropriate Department or Program Co-ordinator must be obtained.

In any one year, it is only the University Timetable which specifies which courses are actually being taught that year, and in which terms. The listing of a course in the calendar is not a guarantee that the course is offered every year.

11.1 General Regulations

11.1.1 Graduating under one calendar

Students with continuous enrolment at the University may elect to graduate under any one calendar in force during their registration subject to the availability of courses with the following exceptions:

  1. Students returning after an interval of a year or more will be readmitted under the calendar in force when they return. Where necessary, an Academic Dean, in consultation with the Registrar, will interpret the student's past record in terms of the current curriculum.

  2. Students who are more than ten years from the start of their degree and are returning after an interval of a year or more will be readmitted under the calendar in force when they return. The University may have course work completed in previous years reassessed to determine its applicability to the current curriculum and degree program. In some cases students may be required to retake a course for which credit was previously earned. An Academic Dean, in consultation with the Registrar, will interpret the student's past record.

Note:  This regulation applies only to curriculum changes affecting a student's degree program, as outlined in Section 11.0 - Academic Programs and Section 12.0 - Programs and Courses of Instruction.

11.1.2 B.A. and B.Sc. Degree Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degrees achieve a balance of breadth, depth and coherence by including these four features in each student's academic program:

  1. The Bachelor's degree requires the completion of 120 credits worth of course work.

  2. Six credits must be earned in each of the four distribution areas: Arts and Letters, Humanities, Science, and Social Science. (see 11.2.2 and 11.3.2)

  3. A specified minimum number of credits earned at an advanced level must be included. (see 11.2.3 and 11.3.5)

  4. One of the following must be completed: a Major plus a Minor; a Double Major; a Joint Major; a General degree of three Minors; or the most specialized degree an Honours program. It is also possible for students to design a program of their own. (See Regulations 11.2.13, 11.2.20, 11.3.17 and 11.3.23)

11.1.3 Declaration of Major, Minor, Honours

B.A. and B.Sc. students, in consultation with the designated Program Advisor, must formally declare a Major and a Minor by the end of the academic session in which they will have achieved third year standing or upon completion of 54 credits . Students should refer to the specific program requirements of their intended Major or Minor. Those opting to do a Double Major or Triple Minor must, in consultation with the designated Program Advisor, declare their intention by the end of the academic session in which they will have achieved third year standing or upon completion of 54 credits . Students can change their choice of program after further consultation with a Program Advisor. A 'Declaration/Change of Major/Minor' form is available on the Mount Allison University website.

Those opting to do an Honours Program must declare their intention by December of the year in which they are registered with third year standing by completing a 'Declaration of Intention to Pursue Honours' form available on the web.

Students must consult with the Department Head or Program Co-ordinator with respect to application processes and admission criteria.

11.2 Bachelor of Arts

11.2.1 Requirements for a B.A. Degree

In order to qualify for a Bachelor of Arts degree, a student must complete 120 credits including:

  1. Six credits must be earned in each of the four distribution areas: Arts and Letters, Humanities, Science, and Social Science, as listed in 11.2.2

  2. A minimum of 36 credits from the 3/4000 level

  3. One of the following must be completed: a Major plus a Minor; a Double Major; a Joint Major; a General degree of three Minors; or the most specialized degree an Honours program. It is also possible for students to design a program of their own, in consultation with an Academic Dean. (See Regulations 11.2.4, 11.2.6, 11.2.8, 11.2.9, 11.2.13, and 11.2.20)

11.2.2 Distribution Requirements

Six credits must be earned from each of the following lists:

Arts and Letters
Art History
Drama
English
Fine Arts
French Studies
German Studies
Hispanic Studies
Japanese Studies
Linguistics
Music
Visual and Material Cultures
Humanities
Canadian Studies
Community Engaged Learning
Classics
Greek
History
Indigenous Studies
Latin
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Visual and Material Cultures
Women's and Gender Studies
Social Sciences
Commerce
Economics
Geography and Environment (GENV)
Health Studies
Indigenous Studies
International Relations
Political Science
Sociology
Women's and Gender Studies
Sciences
Biochemistry
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Data Science
Geography and Environment (GENS)
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Indigenous Studies (INDG) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences, or a combination of those three disciplines. Only those INDG courses cross-listed with GENS can be used towards Science distribution.

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Visual and Material Culture (VMCS) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Arts and Letters or Humanities, or a combination of those two disciplines.

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Women's and Gender Studies (WGST) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Humanities or Social Sciences, or a combination of those two disciplines.

Note: Courses that have been designated by a student to fulfill distribution requirements may also count towards the requirements for a major or minor.

11.2.3 3/4000 Level Courses

A minimum of 36 credits must be earned from courses at the 3000 and/or 4000 level. At least 30 credits must be from Mount Allison courses.

11.2.4 Credits Required for a Major and Minor

The credits required for a B.A. include those required for a Major [see list under 11.2.15], plus the credits required for a Minor from any other program [see lists under 11.2.21 and 11.3.24]. No more than 9 credits can be counted in common between the Major and Minor. Where there are more than 9 credits of requirements in common, the credit value of the combined program will still be at least 15 credits greater than the total for the Major. The Major and Minor are recorded on the student's transcript.

Although the combination of a Major and a Minor as called for in 11.2.4 is the usual means of achieving a B.A. degree, other combinations are possible, as outlined in 11.2.5 through 11.2.9.

11.2.5 Additional Minor

Students who satisfy the requirements for more than one Minor will have the additional Minor(s) recorded on their transcript.

11.2.6 Double Major

Students who (in lieu of the Minor required in 11.2.4) satisfy the requirements for a second Major from any other program [see lists under 11.2.15 and 11.3.18], will have achieved a B.A. with a Double Major, and will have both Majors recorded on their transcript. No more than 24 credits can be counted in common between the two Majors . Even where there are requirements in common, the credit value of the combined program will be at least 36 credits greater than the total for the first Major.

11.2.7 Joint Major

Students who (in lieu of the Minor required in 11.2.4) satisfy the requirements for a Joint Major [see list under 11.2.16] will have achieved a B.A. with a Joint Major.

11.2.8 Honours Degree

Students who (in lieu of 11.2.4) satisfy the requirements for an Honours degree [see 11.2.22] will have achieved a B.A. with Honours, and will have the Honours program recorded on their transcript.

11.2.9 General Degree with Three Minors

Students who (in lieu of 11.2.4) satisfy the requirements for three Minors [see 11.2.17] will have achieved a B.A. General Degree, and will have this title plus all Minors recorded. A triple Minor will not total fewer than 72 credits, despite requirements in common. Students pursuing this option are reminded that Regulation 11.2.3 must still be fulfilled.

11.2.10 The Major as Required for the B.A.

The Major is designed to be approximately one half the course work a student completes toward a B.A. degree, providing the depth and rigour which can be achieved either by work within one discipline or through course work carefully planned under a theme. As called for in 11.2.4, this requirement can be satisfied by completing the courses specified in any one of the named Major listed in 11.2.15, according to one of the options outlined in 11.2.11 through 11.2.14.

11.2.11 Disciplinary Major

A Disciplinary Major consists of a selection of courses worth 60 credits, with a minimum of 36 and a maximum of 42 credits required from a single discipline or department. This type of Major gains its coherence from the traditional discipline from which it is drawn. Provision is made within each Major for 18 credits, usually drawn from outside the Major discipline, intended to complement and enrich the Major.

11.2.12 Interdisciplinary Major

An Interdisciplinary Major consists of a selection of courses worth 60 credits, in most cases. This type of Major gains its coherence from a theme, or approach held in common by its component courses. Such programs are authorized in advance by Senate.

11.2.13 Joint Major

A joint major consists of a selection of courses from two disciplines that have very few, if any, courses that may be counted in common (as under a double Major), that are combined in such a way that while they may not qualify for a complete major in either discipline, there are sufficient courses (normally 42 to 45 credits from each discipline) to qualify for a joint major (maximum 90 credits).

11.2.14 Specially Approved Major

A Specially Approved Major consists of a selection of courses worth 60 credits. This type of Major gains its coherence from a carefully thought-out combination of available courses which has not received prior authorization from Senate. Approval for this type of Major must be obtained from the appropriate Dean, in consultation with the Registrar, by the end of the third year.

11.2.15 Majors Available for the B.A.

For the B.A., the following Majors are available. For a complete list of courses required for each Major, see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Disciplinary
Art History
Classical Studies
Commerce
Computer Science
Economics
English
Fine Arts
French Studies
Geography
Hispanic Studies
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
Visual and Material Culture Studies
Interdisciplinary
American Studies
Canadian Public Policy
Canadian Studies
Cognitive Science
Drama
Environmental Studies
International Relations
Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics
Women's and Gender Studies

11.2.16 Joint Majors Available for the B.A.

For the B.A., the following Joint Majors are available. For a complete list of courses required for each Joint Major, see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Interdisciplinary
Geocomputing
Computer Science and Economics
Computer Science and Music (Pending MPHEC approval)

11.2.17 The Minor as Required for the B.A.

The Minor is designed to be a minimum number of courses by which a student can achieve a modest sense of coherence in another field of study. As called for in 11.2.4, this requirement can be satisfied by completing the courses specified in any one of the named Minors listed in 11.2.21, (or under 11.3.24) according to one of the options outlined in 11.2.18 through 11.2.20.

11.2.18 Disciplinary Minor

A Disciplinary Minor consists of a selection of courses worth 24 credits, at least 6 of which must be completed at the 3000 and/or 4000 level. This type of Minor gains its minimum of coherence from the traditional discipline from which it is drawn.

11.2.19 Interdisciplinary Minor

An Interdisciplinary Minor consists of a selection of courses worth 24 credits, at least 6 of which must be completed at the 3000 and/or 4000 level. This type of Minor gains its coherence from a theme, or approach held in common by its component courses. Such programs are authorized in advance by Senate.

11.2.20 Specially Approved Minor

A Specially Approved Minor consists of a selection of courses worth 24 credits, at least 6 of which must be completed at the 3000 and/or 4000 level. This type of Minor gains its coherence from a carefully thought-out combination of available courses which has not received prior authorization from Senate. Approval for this type of Minor must be obtained from the appropriate Academic Dean, in consultation with the Registrar, by the end of the third year.

11.2.21 Minors Available for the B.A.

For the B.A., the following Minors are available along with those listed under section 11.3.24. For a complete listing of courses required for each Minor, see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Disciplinary
Art History
Classical Studies
Commerce
Computer Science
Economics
English
Fine Arts
French Studies
Geography
German Studies
Greek
Hispanic Studies
History
Indigenous Studies
Latin
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
Visual and Material Culture
Interdisciplinary
American Studies
Canadian Studies
Canadian Public Policy
Community Engaged Learning
Drama
Environmental Studies
Geographic Information Systems (G.I.S.)
International Economics and Business
International Politics
Japanese Studies
Language and the Mind
Museum and Curatorial Studies
Screen Studies and Popular Culture
Visual Communication and Culture
Women's and Gender Studies

11.2.22 Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Honours Programs

Honours programs represent the most specialized selection of courses to gain depth and coherence within one discipline or thematic area. They have traditionally provided the preparation most appropriate for post-graduate work in that field. The requirements for Honours extend beyond that of the Major, and so the regulation requiring a Minor is waived (see 11.2.4 and 11.2.8), although any student who completes a Minor from another discipline or program, will have this Minor recorded on their transcript. Academic regulation 10.10.5 governing the granting of Honours should be consulted. Students considering an Honours Program should consult as early as possible with the designated Program Advisor regarding the prescribed selection of courses.

11.2.23 Honours Programs Available for the B.A.

Under the B.A. Degree, the following Honours Programs are available. Each assumes that the student also meets the requirements of 11.2.2 and 11.2.3. For a complete listing of courses required for each Honours Program, see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Disciplinary
Classical Studies
Computer Science
Computer Science and Mathematics
Economics
English
French Studies
Geography
History
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
Visual and Material Culture
Interdisciplinary
American Studies
Canadian Studies
Cognitive Science
Economics and Mathematics
Environmental Studies
International Relations
Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures
Women's and Gender Studies

11.2.24 Complementary Courses and Prerequisites

If a course prerequisite or the requirements of a Major or Honours program specifies complementary courses from Arts and Letters, Humanities, or Social Sciences, courses from the following departments and programs fall within these groups:

Arts and Letters
Art History
Drama
English
Fine Arts
French Studies
German Studies
Hispanic Studies
Japanese Studies
Linguistics
Music
Visual and Material Cultures
Humanities
Canadian Studies
Classics
Community Engaged Learning
Greek
History
Indigenous Studies
Latin
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Visual and Material Cultures
Women's and Gender Studies
Social Sciences
Anthropology
Commerce
Economics
Geography and Environment (GENV)
Health Studies
Indigenous Studies
International Relations
Political Science
Sociology
Women's and Gender Studies

11.3 Bachelor of Science

11.3.1 Requirements for a B.Sc. Degree

In order to qualify for a Bachelor of Science degree, a student must complete 120 credits including:

  1. Six credits must be earned in each of the four distribution areas: Arts and Letters, Humanities, Science, and Social Science, as listed in 11.3.2

  2. 12 credits must be earned from the Science Core as outlined in 11.3.3

  3. 72 Science credits of which a minimum of 30 credits must be from Science courses at the 3/4000 level (see 11.3.4 and 11.3.5)

  4. One of the following must be completed: a Major plus a Minor; a Double Major; a Joint Major; a General degree of three Minors; or the most specialized degree an Honours program. It is also possible for students to design a program of their own in consultation with the Academic Dean (See Regulations 11.3.6, 11.3.8, 11.3.10, 11.3.11, 11.3.17 and 11.3.23.)

11.3.2 Distribution Requirements

Six credits must be earned from each of the following lists:

Arts and Letters
Art History
Drama
English
Fine Arts
French Studies
German Studies
Hispanic Studies
Japanese Studies
Linguistics
Music
Visual and Material Cultures
Humanities
Canadian Studies
Classics
Community Engaged Learning
Greek
History
Indigenous Studies
Latin
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Visual and Material Cultures
Women's and Gender Studies
Social Sciences
Commerce
Economics
Geography and Environment (GENV)
Health Studies
Indigenous Studies
International Relations
Political Science
Sociology
Women's and Gender Studies
Sciences
Biochemistry
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Data Science
Geography and Environment (GENS)
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology

Note: Science distribution is fulfilled by Bachelor of Science degree requirements.

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Indigenous Studies (INDG) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences, or a combination of those three disciplines. Only those INDG courses cross-listed with GENS can be used towards Science distribution.

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Visual and Material Culture (VMCS) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Arts and Letters or Humanities, or a combination of those two disciplines.

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Women's and Gender Studies (WGST) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Humanities or Social Sciences, or a combination of those two disciplines.

11.3.3 Science Core

Twelve credits must be earned as follows:

  1. 6 credits from MATH 1111 or 1151 plus one of MATH 1121, 1251, 1311, 2211, 2221 or COMP 1631

  2. 3 credits from CHEM 1001 or PHYS 1041 or PHYS 1051

  3. 3 credits from BIOL 1001, BIOL 1501, BIOC 1001, GENS 1401, PSYC 1001 or PSYC 1011

11.3.4 Minimum Number of Science Credits

A minimum of 72 credits in Science must be earned from the Science disciplines.

11.3.5 3/4000 Level Science Courses

A minimum of 30 credits in Science must be earned from the 3000 and/or 4000 level. At least 24 credits must be from Mount Allison courses.

11.3.6 Credits Required for a Major and Minor

The credits required for a B.Sc. include those required for a Major [see list under 11.3.18], plus the credits required for a Minor from any other program [see lists under 11.3.21 and 11.2.24]. No more than 9 credits can be counted in common between the Major and Minor . Where there are more than 9 credits of requirements in common, the credit value of the combined program will still be at least 15 credits greater than the total for the Major. The Major and Minor are recorded on the student's transcript. Although the combination of a Major and a Minor as called for in 11.3.6 is the usual means of achieving a B.Sc., other combinations are possible, as outlined in 11.3.7 through 11.3.11.

11.3.7 Additional Minor

Students who satisfy the requirements for more than one Minor will have the additional Minor(s) recorded on their transcript.

11.3.8 Double Major

Students who (in lieu of the Minor required in 12.3.6) satisfy the requirements for a second Major from any other program [see lists under 11.3.15 and 11.2.18] will have achieved a B.Sc. with a Double Major, and will have both Majors recorded on their transcript. No more than 24 credits can be counted in common between the two Majors . Even where there are requirements in common, the credit value of the combined program will be at least 36 credits greater than the total for the first Major.

11.3.9 Joint Major

Students who (in lieu of the Minor required in 11.3.4) satisfy the requirements for a Joint Major [see list under 11.3.19], will have achieved a B.Sc. with a Joint Major.

11.3.10 Honours Degree

Students who (in lieu of 11.3.6) satisfy the requirements for an Honours degree [see 11.3.25] will have achieved a B.Sc. with Honours, and will have the Honours program recorded on their transcript.

11.3.11 General Degree with Three Minors

Students who (in lieu of 11.3.6) satisfy the requirements for three Minors, at least two of which must be in Science (see 11.3.20) will have achieved a B.Sc. General Degree, and will have this title plus the three (or more) Minors recorded on their transcript. A triple Minor will not total fewer than 72 credits, despite requirements in common. Students pursuing this option are reminded that Regulations 11.3.4 and 11.3.5 must still be fulfilled.

11.3.12 Courses which Qualify as Science Credits

For purposes of Regulation 11.3.4 and 11.3.5 only, all courses offered in the following disciplines are considered as Science credits: Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Cognitive Science, Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. The following courses outside of these disciplines may also count as Science credits: COMM 3411, ECON 3301, 3821, 4711, 4721, 4801, 4811, HLTH 3011, all GENS courses from the Department of Geography and Environment, PHIL 2511, 3511. Exceptions, including 1991/2991/3991/4991 courses, may be approved by the Dean of Science in consultation with the appropriate Department.

11.3.13 The Major As Required for the B.Sc.

The Major is designed to be approximately one half the course work a student completes toward a B.Sc. degree, providing the depth and rigour which can be achieved either by work within one discipline or through course work carefully orchestrated under a theme. As called for in 11.3.6, this requirement can be satisfied by completing the courses specified in any one of the named Major in Science listed in 11.3.18, according to one of the options outlined in 11.3.14 through 11.3.17.

11.3.14 Disciplinary Major

A Disciplinary Major in Science consists of a selection of courses worth 60 to 72 credits, with a minimum of 36 and a maximum of 42 credits required from a single discipline or department. This type of Major gains its coherence from the traditional discipline from which it is drawn. Provision is made within each Major for credits under 11.3.3.

11.3.15 Interdisciplinary Major

An Interdisciplinary Major consists of a selection of courses worth 60 to 84 credits. This type of Major gains its coherence from a theme, or approach held in common by its component courses. Such programs are authorized in advance by Senate.

11.3.16 Joint Major

A joint major consists of a selection of courses from two disciplines that have very few, if any, courses that may be counted in common (as under a double Major), that are combined in such a way that while they may not qualify for a complete major in either discipline, there are sufficient courses (normally 42 to 45 credits from each discipline) to qualify for a joint major (maximum 90 credits).

11.3.17 Specially Approved Major

A Specially Approved Major consists of a selection of courses worth 60 to 72 credits. This type of Major gains its coherence from a carefully thought out combination of available courses which has not received prior authorization from Senate. Approval for this type of Major must be obtained from the appropriate Academic Dean, in consultation with the Registrar, by the end of the third year.

11.3.18 Majors available for the B.Sc.

For the B.Sc., the following Majors are available. For a complete listing of courses required for each Major, see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Disciplinary
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology
Interdisciplinary
Aviation
Biochemistry
Biopsychology
Cognitive Science
Environmental Science

11.3.19 Joint Majors available for the B.Sc.

For the B.Sc., the following Joint Majors are available. For a complete listing of courses required for each Joint Major, see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Interdisciplinary
None available at this time

11.3.20 The Minor as Required for the B.Sc.

The Minor is designed to be a minimum number of courses by which a student can achieve a modest sense of the coherence in another field of study. As called for in 11.3.6, this requirement can be satisfied by completing the courses specified in any one of the named Minors listed in 11.3.24 (or under 11.2.21), according to one of the options outlined in 11.3.21 through 11.3.23.

11.3.21 Disciplinary Minor

A Disciplinary Minor consists of a selection of courses worth 24 credits, at least 6 credits of which must be completed at the 3000 and/or 4000 level. This type of Minor gains its minimum of coherence from the traditional discipline from which it is drawn.

11.3.22 Interdisciplinary Minor

An Interdisciplinary Minor consists of a selection of courses worth 24 credits, at least 6 credits of which must be completed at the 3000 and/or 4000 level. This type of Minor gains its coherence from a theme, or approach held in common by its component courses. Such programs are authorized in advance by Senate.

11.3.23 Specially Approved Minor

A Specially Approved Minor consists of a selection of courses worth 24 credits, at least 6 of which must be completed at the 3000 and/or 4000 level. This type of Minor gains its coherence from a carefully thought out combination of available courses which has not received prior authorization from Senate. Approval for this type of Minor must be obtained from the appropriate Academic Dean, in consultation with the Registrar, by the end of the third year.

11.3.24 Minors Available for the B.Sc.

For the B.Sc., the following Minors are available along with those listed under 11.2.21. For a complete listing of courses required for each Minor, see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Disciplinary
Applied Physics
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology
Interdisciplinary
Astronomy
Biochemistry
Data Science
Environmental Science
Geographic Information Systems
Indigenous Environmental Science

11.3.25 Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Honours Programs

Honours programs represent the most specialized selection of courses to gain depth and coherence within one discipline or thematic area. They have traditionally provided the preparation most appropriate for post-graduate work in that field. The requirements for Honours extend beyond that of the Major, and so the regulation requiring a Minor is waived (see 11.3.6 and 11.3.10), although any student who completes a Minor from another discipline or program will have this Minor recorded on their transcript. Academic regulation 10.10.5 governing the granting of Honours should be consulted. Students considering an Honours Program should consult as early as possible with the designated Program Advisor regarding a prescribed selection of courses.

11.3.26 Honours Programs Available for the B.Sc.

Under the B.Sc. Degree, the following Honours Programs are available. Each assumes that the student also meets the requirements of 11.3.2 through 11.3.5. For a complete listing of courses required for each Honours Program see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Disciplinary
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science and Mathematics
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology
Interdisciplinary
Biochemistry
Biopsychology
Cognitive Science
Computer Science and Physics
Environmental Science
Mathematics and Physics

11.4 Master of Science

Graduate work is approved for the Master of Science in Biology and Master of Science in Chemistry.

11.4.1 Dean of Graduate Studies

All graduate work is administered by the Dean of Graduate Studies. Upon receiving recommendations from the Department concerned, the proposed supervisor, and the Office of the Registrar, the Dean of Graduate Studies will decide upon admission. In case of discordant recommendations the application will be revisited by the Dean of Graduate Studies, the Provost, the proposed supervisor, the department head, and an independent member of the university community (faculty or administration) selected by the proposed supervisor and Dean. The Dean of Graduate Studies will oversee the program of study, and on receipt of satisfactory evidence of the completion of the studies, will recommend the awarding of the degree.

11.4.2 Minimum Admission Requirements

  1. A four-year Bachelor of Science degree with a minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 (on 4.3) or the equivalent with research experience in the intended field of study or its equivalent from a University of recognized standing (students with relevant professional experience and international students from institutions with different academic norms will be considered on a case by case basis); and

  2. As English is the primary language of instruction at Mount Allison University, students must possess a mastery of English as outlined in section 3.7 of the Calendar.

  3. Two letters of reference

  4. A letter of support from the proposed Mount Allison supervisor including the duration, amount, and source of financial support offered to the student

Note:  Applicants should submit a completed application form, curriculum vitae, a set of official transcripts, and arrange to have two letters of reference forwarded to the Dean of Graduate Studies. Applicants are also expected to contact potential supervisor(s) about the possibility of carrying on advanced study and research with them prior to application.

11.4.3 Time Required

  1. The minimum time from admission to a graduate studies program to defense of the thesis is three academic terms.

  2. The thesis should be defended within eight academic terms for a full-time student and fifteen academic terms for a part-time student.

  3. If extenuating circumstances prevent a student from completing a graduate studies program within the normal period specified, the Dean of Graduate Studies may grant an extension of up to one academic term.

11.4.4 Course and Thesis Requirements

  1. All candidates must:

    1. complete a minimum of two to a maximum of four 3 credit graduate level courses as determined by the supervisory committee and confirmed by the Dean of Graduate Studies;

    2. complete a research program and a thesis based on this research; and

    3. participate in a departmental seminar series.

  2. Within one month of a student's admission to the program, the supervisory committee will:

    1. formulate a list of the number and type of graduate courses for that candidate; and

    2. forward this list to the Dean of Graduate Studies for confirmation.

  3. When a department intends to offer a graduate studies course, it must submit course information at least one month in advance to the Dean of Graduate Studies for approval.

  4. The format of the written thesis will follow the rules for graduate theses as described in the graduate handbook.

  5. Both a bound paper copy and an electronic copy (Microsoft Word of pdf file format) of the thesis must be made available to the members of the candidate's Examining Committee at least three weeks prior to its defense.

11.4.5 Standards of Achievement

The candidate must achieve a grade of at least B- in each course required for the degree, and also must pass a public oral examination on the thesis and related material.

11.4.6 Supervisory Committee

Within one month of admission, a committee will be appointed for each candidate by the Dean of Graduate Studies on the recommendation of the research supervisor who will be its chair. The Supervisory Committee shall consist of the research supervisor who will act as chair and a minimum of two other qualified individuals. It will be the responsibility of this committee to review periodically the progress of the candidate, read the thesis and conduct the oral examination which will be presided over by the Dean of Graduate Studies or designate. The Thesis Examining Committee will also include a qualified reader external to the university who has had no involvement in the project appointed by the Dean of Graduate Studies in consultation with the supervisor. A grade of 'Pass' or 'Fail' will be assessed for the thesis and its defense by the candidate's Thesis Examining Committee. If a 'Fail' evaluation is rendered, the supervisory committee will decide if and what remedial measure must be undertaken to obtain a 'Pass' grade. The candidate will have six months to meet these conditions.

11.4.7 Master of Science Course Listing

GRADUATE LEVEL TOPIC IN BIOLOGY

Format: Variable
Prereq: Registration in the M.Sc program and permission of the Department Head and course instructor

GRADUATE LEVEL TOPIC IN CHEMISTRY

Format: Variable
Prereq: Registration in the M.Sc program and permission of the Department Head and course instructor

GRADUATE THESIS

Format: Independent Study/Thesis
Prereq: Registration in the M.Sc. program

11.5 Bachelor of Commerce

11.5.1 Primary Objective

The primary objective of the Mount Allison University Commerce program is to explore with students the nature of the business world, and thus help them acquire business knowledge and skills. Studies focus on the process of effective problem solving and decision making in the business environment through the development of management systems which combine quantitative analysis and human judgement. The Commerce program is designed to enable students to take courses in a variety of business subject areas (such as Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing) while completing a Minor in a non-Commerce discipline. The Commerce degree at Mount Allison University is highly flexible, reflecting the diverse business society that students will enter after graduation.

11.5.2 Requirements for a Bachelor of Commerce Degree

In order to qualify for a Bachelor of Commerce degree, a student must complete 120 credits including:

  1. 6 credits earned in each of the two distribution areas of Arts and Letters and Humanities (see 11.5.3)

  2. A minimum of 39 credits from the 3/4000 level (see 11.5.4)

  3. 42 credits from the Commerce Degree Core Program requirements as listed in 11.5.5

  4. 27 additional Commerce elective credits, with at least 24 credits from 3/4000 level courses (see 11.5.6)

  5. Courses which satisfy the requirements of a Minor (see 11.5.7) Note: this requirement is waived for students pursuing Honours in Economics

11.5.3 Distribution Requirements

Six credits must be earned from each of the following lists:

Arts and Letters
Art History
Drama
English
Fine Arts
French Studies
German Studies
Hispanic Studies
Japanese Studies
Linguistics
Music
Visual and Material Culture
Humanities
Canadian Studies
Classics
Community Engaged Learning
Greek
History
Indigenous Studies
Latin
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Visual and Material Culture
Women's and Gender Studies

Note: Social Science and Science distributions are fulfilled by Bachelor of Commerce degree requirements.

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Visual and Material Culture (VMCS) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Arts and Letters or Humanities, or a combination of those two disciplines.

11.5.4 3/4000 Level Courses

A minimum of 39 credits must be earned from courses at the 3000 and/or 4000 level. At least 33 credits must be from Mount Allison courses.

11.5.5 Commerce Degree Core Requirements

The Commerce Degree Core Requirements are 42 credits earned as follows:

27credits from Commerce 1011, 1411, 2101, 2131, 2201, 2301, 3501, 4311, 4321
6credits from Economics 1001 and 1011
3credits in Computer Science or Mathematics* (excluding MATH 1011)
6credits from Economics 1701 and 2701
 OR MATH 1311 and ECON 2701
 OR MATH 1311 and 2321
 OR PSYC 2001 and 2011
 OR SOCI 3301 and 3311
 OR WGST 3111 and WGST 3121
 OR COMM 3401 and GENV 3701

*Note:  MATH 1111 or 1151 is required for Honours in Economics.

11.5.6 Commerce Electives on the Bachelor of Commerce Degree

In addition to the Commerce courses required for the Core, 27 credits from Commerce elective courses are required with at least 24 credits from 3/4000 level courses. All Commerce courses other than those in the Core of the program (see 11.5.5), as well as the following courses from other disciplines may also be counted as Commerce electives: Economics 3201, 3211, 3301, 3601, 3711, 3921, 4501, 4521, 4611, 4621, 4711, 4721, 4801, 4811, 4821, 4990, Computer Science 3851.

11.5.7 The Minor as Required for the Bachelor of Commerce

All Bachelor of Commerce students must complete a Minor in a non-Commerce discipline from the list below or a Specially Approved Minor (see 11.2.20). No more than 9 credits can be counted in common between the Minor and the courses counted in 11.5.5 and 11.5.6. Where there are more than 9 credits of requirements in common, the credit value of the combined program requirements will still be at least 84 credits. The Minor will be recorded on the transcript. Students who satisfy the requirements for more than one Minor will have the additional Minor(s) recorded on their transcript.

Note: the regulation requiring a Minor is waived for students pursuing Honours in Economics and Commerce-Aviation. Students who complete a Minor will have the Minor recorded on the transcript.

Minors Available for the Bachelor of Commerce

Disciplinary
Applied Physics
Art History
Biology
Chemistry
Classical Studies
Computer Science
Economics
English
Fine Arts
French Studies
Geography
German Studies
Greek
Hispanic Studies
History
Indigenous Studies
Latin
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Sociology
Visual and Material Culture
Interdisciplinary
American Studies
Astronomy
Biochemistry
Canadian Studies
Canadian Public Policy
Community Engaged Learning
Data Science
Drama
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Health Studies
Indigenous Environmental Science
International Economics and Business
International Politics
Japanese Studies
Language and the Mind
Museum and Curatorial Studies
Screen Studies and Popular Culture
Visual Communication and Culture
Women's and Gender Studies

11.5.8 Elective Credits

The remaining credits beyond those completed to fulfill 11.5.3, 11.5.5, 11.5.6 and 11.5.7 may be from any discipline.

11.5.9 Honours Programs Available for the Bachelor of Commerce

Students who satisfy the requirements for an Honours program [see section 11.5.10, 11.5.11] will have achieved a Bachelor of Commerce with Honours, and will have the Honours program recorded on their transcript. Students with third year standing interested in pursuing Honours must apply to the Commerce Department by March 31, in the year in which they will have completed at least 84 credits. Students interested in pursuing Honours in Economics should contact the Economics Department. Academic regulation 10.10.5 governing the granting of Honours should be consulted. In addition to the prescribed Honours courses listed in 11.5.10 and 11.5.11, students must fulfill the general requirements for a Bachelor of Commerce degree as listed in 11.5.2. a), b), and e).

11.5.10 Commerce with Honours

Honours in Commerce is 69 credits earned as follows:

42from the Commerce core requirements (see 11.5.5)
6from Commerce 4990
21from Commerce electives at the 3/4000 level

11.5.11 Commerce with Honours in Economics

Honours in Economics is 90 credits earned as follows:

42from the Commerce core requirements (see 11.5.5)
12from Economics 2001, 2011, 2101, 2111
12from Economics 4001, 4011, 4711, 4721, 4801, 4811, 4821, 4990
12from Economics at the 3/4000 level
12from Commerce or Economics at the 3/4000 level

Note: the regulation requiring a Minor is waived for students pursuing Honours in Economics

11.5.12 Commerce - Aviation offered in conjunction with MFC Training

This interdisciplinary program combines courses in accounting, finance, management and marketing as well as courses in math, economics, and computer science together with credit for aviation courses studied at MFC Training.

Entrance Requirements

  1. Each prospective student for Commerce - Aviation must meet the general admissions requirements of Mount Allison (section 3) and should declare their intention to pursue Aviation at time of application.

  2. Each prospective student for Commerce- Aviation must obtain and present a Transport Canada Category 1 medical certificate before commencing flight training.

  3. Each prospective student for Commerce - Aviation must demonstrate English language proficiency by informal or formal assessment as determined by the MFC Training.

Note:  Students must achieve second-year standing (earn 24 credits) prior to beginning the practical elements of the program. The practical elements of the program may require training time outside the traditional September-April teaching period. Students should consult with the Program Advisor about the time commitment needed.

Commerce - Aviation is 120 credits earned as follows:

42from the Commerce Core requirements (see 11.5.5)
12from distribution courses comprised of 6 credits earned in Arts and Letters, and 6 credits earned in Humanities (see 11.5.3)
6from GENS 1401, 2421
24from Commerce electives, with at least 18 credits at the 3/4000 level including 3 credits from COMM 4381 Business of Aviation
36

credits twelve of which are designated at the 3/4000 level as follows:

  1. from MFC Training through completing the requirements for flight training outlined in the Handbook for the Mount Allison Bachelor of Science (Aviation) including the Commercial Pilot License with Multi-engine and Instrument Flight Rules ratings, or

  2. from MFC Training by transfer after completion of the Diploma in Aviation Technology (Pilot), or

  3. from Confederation College by transfer after completion of the Aviation Flight Management Diploma

Note: the regulation requiring a Minor is waived for students pursuing a Bachelor of Commerce- Aviation

*Consultation with the Program Advisor must occur before the student's second year of study.

11.5.13 Major from Other Disciplines

Students who, in lieu of 11.5.7, complete a Major in a non-Commerce discipline as listed in 11.2.15 and 11.3.18 will have the Major recorded on their transcript. No more than 24 credits can be counted in common between the major and the courses counted in 11.5.5 and 11.5.6. Where there are more than 24 credits of requirements in common, the credit value of the combined program requirements will still be at least 105 credits. Students who satisfy the requirements for a Specially Approved Major (see 11.2.14) will have that Major recorded on their transcript.

11.5.14 Transferring to Commerce

Students applying to transfer into the Bachelor of Commerce program must have completed twelve credits from the following Core courses with grades of at least 'C-': COMM 1011, COMM 1411 or a Computer Science course, ECON 1001 and ECON 1011.

11.6 Bachelor of Music

The Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.) degree is designed to develop well-rounded musicians and to provide sound education in the liberal arts. The program includes required courses on solo and large ensemble performance, music history, music theory, and musicianship, all of which focus mainly on Western art (“classical”) music in staff notation. These required courses are supplemented by electives on a broad range of musical traditions, including world music, popular music, and jazz. The B.Mus. is offered without designated majors, so students have considerable latitude in their choice of electives, and the Department of Music offers individual advising on appropriate elective course choices for various career paths. Music electives encompass several areas of specialization, including composition and music technology, conducting, music education, music scholarship (music history, music theory), and performance. Students in the B.Mus. program may declare a Minor in another discipline, and a Minor in Music is available to students in other degree programs. The Department of Music also offers instruction leading to a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Honours and Major in music; a Joint B.A. Major in Computer Science and Music; and a Certificate in Music Education. Details regarding all of these programs can be found in Section 12 of this Academic Calendar.

11.6.1 Financial Assistance

Students applying for studies in Music are eligible for University general entrance scholarships in addition to those specifically established for students in Music. For detailed information, refer to Section 5, Financial Assistance.

11.6.2 Entrance Requirements for the Bachelor of Music Degree

  1. Each prospective student must meet the general admission requirements of Mount Allison.

  2. In addition, all prospective Bachelor of Music students must appear for an audition-interview as part of the application for admission. See the Department's website for detailed audition requirements for each instrument. Vocalists and instrumentalists may either provide their own pianist or have one provided by the University for a nominal fee. In addition, each applicant will be asked to write a one-hour Entrance Assessment. This Assessment is designed to reflect the applicant's background and perception in aural skills, written theory, and musical terms, and will determine placement in either MUSC 1001 or 1101. If the applicant cannot arrange to come to Sackville for a personal audition, an audition recording may be sent directly to the Department of Music, and an Entrance Assessment will be sent upon request to the applicant's teacher to be administered by them.

  3. Prospective students should see the Department's website or contact the Department of Music directly for information about audition dates.

11.6.3 Requirements for Bachelor of Music Degree

In order to qualify for a Bachelor of Music Degree, a student must complete 120 credits including:

  1. 54 credits from the following required core:

    1. 42 credits from MUSC 1101, 1111, 1201, 1211, 1221, 1703, 2101, 2201, 2211, 2703 and MUSC, 2501, 2511, 3501, 4501

    2. 3 credits from MUSC 2111, 2121

    3. 3 credits from MUSC 3511, 3581, 3591; and 3 credits from MUSC 4511, 4581, 4591

    4. 3 credits from MUSC 1619-4619, 1639-4639, 1659-4659, 1669-4669

  2. 36-39 credits from the following Music electives:

    1. Theory and Composition (MUSC 2111, 2121, 2141, 2151, 2171, 3121, 3141, 3151, 3161, 3171, 4181)

    2. Music History and Literature (MUSC 2021, 3001, 3201, 3221, 3231, 3261, 3271, 3281, 4221)

    3. Music Education (MUSC 2301, 3301, 3311, 3321, 3331, 3341, 3351, 3361, 4311, 4361)

    4. Performance Electives (MUSC 1501, 1511, 1521, 1601, 1801, 1811, 2603, 2613, 3401, 3411, 3421, 3603, 3613, 3801, 3813 4603, 4613, 4803 and MUSC 1619-4619, 1629-4629, 1639-4639, 1649-4649, 1659-4659, 1669-4669, 1689-4689, 1699-4699)

    5. General Music Electives (MUSC 1991, 2991, 3991, 4991, 4951; these courses may be repeated if topics differ); COMM 3271, 4301; PHYS 1401

  3. 27-30 non-Music electives

Note:  All piano and organ students must complete MUSC 1601. It is recommended that this course be completed within the first two years of study.

Note:  All voice students must complete MUSC 1521 in the course of their degree. It is recommended that this course be completed within the first two years of study.

Note:  Performance Electives may be offered in one term only or over two terms. Please consult the timetable for specific information.

Note:  COMM 3271, 4301, and PHYS 1401 may be used toward the degree either as general music electives or as non-Music electives.

11.6.4 Music Ensembles

All B.Mus. students must participate in a core ensemble during every year in which they are registered for an Applied Music or Recital course. The core ensemble will normally be determined by the Applied Music instructor in consultation with the student and the Ensemble Directors, and will be chosen to suit the student's interests and developmental needs, and the requirements of the ensemble program. All music ensembles run for two terms and are valued at one credit per year of participation. B.Mus. students may complete up to three elective ensemble credits in addition to their required core ensemble credits, for a maximum of seven on their degree. Students in all other degree programs are eligible to complete up to six credits on their degree through ensemble participation.

The following may be taken for core ensemble credit; they may additionally be taken for elective credit: 1619-4619 Wind Ensemble; 1639-4639 Symphonic Band; 1659-4659 Elliott Chorale; 1669-4669 Choral Society. The following may only be taken for elective ensemble credit: 1629-4629 Chamber Orchestra; 1649-4649 Jazz Ensemble; 1689-4689 Special Ensemble; 1699-4699 New Brunswick Youth Orchestra. All ensembles are valued at 1 credit per year of participation.

Attendance and prompt arrival at all ensemble rehearsals and participation in all public performances are mandatory unless prior consent of the Director of the ensemble has been obtained. Preparedness for and active participation in rehearsals and performances, as well as regular attendance, are principal factors in the determination of the grade that the student will receive. The details of the application of this policy will be provided by Ensemble Directors at the beginning of each academic year.

11.6.5 Recitals

In addition to performing in Collegium programs, qualified students are given the opportunity to present credited full-length and shared solo recitals. These courses replace 3rd and 4th year applied courses as follows:

MUSC 3511 is replaced by either MUSC 3581 or MUSC 3591

MUSC 4511 is replaced by either MUSC 4581 or MUSC 4591

Third year level shared and full recitals:  To be eligible to present a shared recital (MUSC 3581) or a full recital (MUSC 3591), a student must be recommended by their Applied Music instructor; must normally have achieved a grade of at least A- in MUSC 3501; must have participated in two Collegia, or the equivalent, since enrolling in the Bachelor of Music program; and must pass a Recital Application Jury.

Fourth year level shared and full recitals:  To be eligible to present a shared recital (MUSC 4581), a student must be recommended by their Applied Music teacher; must normally have achieved a grade of at least A- in MUSC 4501; must have participated in two Collegia, or the equivalent, since enrolling in the Bachelor of Music program; and must pass a Recital Application Jury.

To be eligible to present a full recital (MUSC 4591), a student must be recommended by their Applied Music instructor; must normally have successfully completed MUSC 3581 or MUSC 3591; must normally have achieved a grade of at least A- in MUSC 4501; and must pass a Recital Application Jury.

11.7 Bachelor of Fine Arts

The Department of Fine Arts, located in the Purdy Crawford Centre for the Arts Building, offers a unique opportunity for professional training in the Fine Arts in conjunction with all the benefits of a university campus. These include the stimulus of a broad intellectual environment, the facilities of a good library and a balanced program of social activities.

11.7.1 The Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree

The curriculum in Fine Arts leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts is primarily intended to develop creative ability in drawing, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture. The major part of the program consists of studio work, and includes instruction in the principles of design and the use of various media. In addition to the studio classes, attention is given to the artist's heritage through illustrated lectures and seminar courses in art history which are designed to improve the student's artistic judgement and assist in acquiring an ability to write and speak about works of art. Academic electives, which are chosen in consultation with the Fine Arts Department, are taken in other departments of the University. They are included in the curriculum with the aim of widening the student's understanding of the world, in the belief that the artist's domain pertains to all aspects of human endeavour.

11.7.2 Additional Admission Requirements

Each prospective student must meet the regular admission requirements of the University. While the course is designed so that it assumes no previous training on the part of the new student, applicants must give evidence of their suitability for work in this specialized field. Applicants are required to present a portfolio of their previous art work for assessment prior to admission to this program. Instructions for the submission of this portfolio will be sent to all applicants for admission to the program or can be found on the Fine Arts website. All portfolios are reviewed each year in February and late portfolios cannot be considered. Only a limited number of students can be accepted to the program.

11.7.3 Advanced Status

A student may be admitted to the second year of the program provided full entrance requirements are met and if the applicant presents evidence of having satisfactorily completed work, academic and artistic, equivalent to the prescribed work of the first year.

11.7.4 Requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree

The Bachelor of Fine Arts is a four-year, 120-credit degree. The program is designed with maximum flexibility to allow student growth within various studio art study fields. The common first year of the program is followed in years two to four by various studio art options.

  1. A student who fails any studio course will not be allowed to take further courses in that studio area until the failed course is completed satisfactorily.

  2. In either the third or fourth year of the program students are required to travel to a major North American art centre (e.g. Boston, New York, Montreal/Ottawa), in the company of one or more professors, as part of a class field trip for the purpose of study and research at art museums and galleries.

Year One:

  1. 18 Studio credits from FINA 1101, 1111, 1921, 1931, 1941, and 1951.

  2. 6 credits from ARTH 2101, ARTH/MUSE 2111

  3. 6 credits from outside of Fine Arts, Art History, and Museum and Curatorial Studies (see Notes below)

Year Two:

  1. 18 Studio credits selected from FINA 2101, 2111, 2201, 2211, 2301, 2311, 2401, 2411, 2501, 2511

  2. 6 credits from 3/4000 level Art History (ARTH) and/or Museum and Curatorial Studies (MUSE) courses or from ENGL 3621, FREN 2801, GERM 2701, PHIL 2401

  3. 6 credits from outside of Fine Arts, Art History, and Museum and Curatorial Studies (see Notes below)

Year Three:

  1. 15 Studio credits from FINA 3101, 3111, 3201, 3211, 3301, 3311, 3401, 3411, 3501, 3511, 3601, 3611

  2. FINA 3701 - Third Year Seminar

  3. 6 credits from 3/4000 level Art History (ARTH) and/or Museum and Curatorial Studies (MUSE) courses or from ENGL 3621, FREN 2801, GERM 2701, PHIL 2401

  4. 6 credits from outside of Fine Arts, Art History, and Museum and Curatorial Studies (see Notes below)

Year Four:

  1. 12 Studio credits - FINA 4801, 4811, 4821, 4831

  2. 3 additional credits from 2/3000 level studio courses

  3. Fine Arts 4701 - Fourth Year Seminar

  4. 6 credits from 3/4000 level Art History (ARTH) and/or Museum and Curatorial Studies (MUSE) courses or from ENGL 3621, FREN 2801, GERM 2701, PHIL 2401

  5. 6 credits from outside of Fine Arts, Art History, and Museum and Curatorial Studies (see Notes below)

Note:  24 credits from Art History courses are required as a component of the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree program and therefore a Minor in Art History is not recorded as a separate additional credential.

Note:  ENGL 3621, FREN 2801, GERM 2701, PHIL 2401 count as Art History courses for BFA students and cannot be counted toward the 24 credits from electives outside of Fine Arts, Art History, and Museum and Curatorial Studies.

Note:  BFA students who complete a Minor from those listed under section 11.2.21 or 11.3.24 (excluding Art History and Fine Arts), or a Specially Approved Minor (see 11.2.20), will have the Minor recorded on the transcript.

11.7.5 Entrance Scholarship

The E.B. Pulford Scholarship is normally awarded to the top incoming B.F.A. student, based on portfolio assessments.

11.8 Bachelor of Arts and Science

11.8.1 Requirements for a B.A. & Sc. Degree

In order to qualify for a Bachelor of Arts and Science degree, a student must complete 120 credits including:

  1. Six credits must be earned in each of the four distribution areas: Arts and Letters, Humanities, Science, and Social Science, as listed in 11.8.2

  2. A minimum of 36 credits from Science courses (see 11.3.12)

  3. A minimum of 36 credits from non-Science courses in disciplines from Arts and Letters, Humanities, or Social Science, as defined in 11.8.2

  4. A minimum of 30 credits from the 3/4000 level (see 11.8.3)

  5. One of the following must be completed: a Major; or an Honours program

11.8.2 Distribution Requirements

Six credits must be earned from each of the following lists:

Arts and Letters
Art History
Drama
English
Fine Arts
French Studies
German Studies
Hispanic Studies
Japanese Studies
Linguistics
Music
Visual and Material Cultures
Humanities
Canadian Studies
Community Engaged Learning
Classics
Greek
History
Indigenous Studies
Latin
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Visual and Material Cultures
Women's and Gender Studies
Social Sciences
Commerce
Economics
Geography and Environment (GENV)
Health Studies
Indigenous Studies
International Relations
Political Science
Sociology
Women's and Gender Studies
Sciences
Biochemistry
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Data Science
Geography and Environment (GENS)
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Indigenous Studies (INDG) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Humanities, Sciences or Social Sciences, or a combination of those three disciplines. Only those INDG courses cross-listed with GENS can be used towards Science distribution.

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Visual and Material Culture (VMCS) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Arts and Letters or Humanities, or a combination of those two disciplines.

Note: For distribution requirement purposes, a maximum or 6 credits from Women's and Gender Studies (WGST) courses can be applied to meet the distribution requirements for either Humanities or Social Sciences, or a combination of those two disciplines.

Note: Courses that have been designated by a student to fulfill distribution requirements may also count towards the requirements for a major or minor.

11.8.3 3/4000 Level Courses

A minimum of 30 credits must be earned from courses at the 3000 and/or 4000 level. At least 24 credits must be from Mount Allison courses.

11.8.4 Credits Required for a Major

The credits required for a B.A. & Sc. include those required for a Major [see list under 11.8.6]. The Major will be recorded on the student's transcript.

Note: B.A. & Sc. students are not required to complete a Minor. Students who do complete a Minor from those listed under section 11.2.21 or 11.3.24 will have the Minor recorded on the transcript.

11.8.5 Honours Degree

Students who (in lieu of 11.8.4) satisfy the requirements for an Honours degree [see 11.8.7] will have achieved a B.A. & Sc. with Honours, and will have the Honours program recorded on their transcript. Honours programs represent the most specialized selection of courses to gain depth and coherence within one discipline or thematic area. They have traditionally provided the preparation most appropriate for post-graduate work in that field. Academic regulation 10.10.5 governing the granting of Honours should be consulted. Students considering an Honours Program should consult as early as possible with the designated Program Advisor regarding the prescribed selection of courses.

11.8.6 Majors Available for the B.A. & Sc.

For the B.A. & Sc., the following Majors are available. For a complete list of courses required for each Major, see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Interdisciplinary
Health Studies

11.8.7 Honours Programs Available for the B.A. & Sc.

Under the B.A. & Sc. Degree, the following Honours Programs are available. Each assumes that the student also meets the requirements of 11.8.2 and 11.8.3. For a complete listing of courses required for each Honours Program, see the appropriate heading under Programs and Courses of Instruction.

Interdisciplinary
Health Studies

11.9 Certificate of Bilingualism/ Certificat De Bilinguisme

Mount Allison students who can demonstrate a high level of competence in both of Canada's official languages may qualify for a Certificate of Bilingualism. The Certificate, which is awarded upon graduation, attests to the student's ability to speak, understand, and write English and French with ease and proficiency. The formal recognition afforded by the Certificate could prove particularly valuable to graduates seeking employment in the many business and government careers where knowledge of both French and English is a requirement or an asset. Any student may apply to be examined for the Certificate, whether or not they have taken French or English courses at Mount Allison. The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures administers the Certificate program and any inquiries should be directed to the Department.

Les étudiants de Mount Allison capables de montrer qu'ils possèdent une bonne connaissance des deux langues officielles du Canada peuvent se présenter au concours du Certificat de bilinguisme. Ce certificat décerné lors de la remise des diplômes, fait foi que les étudiants ont démontré leur capacité de lire, d'écrire, de parler et de comprendre le français et l'anglais avec facilitié et correction. L'attestation officielle que représente le Certificat pourrait s'avérer utile aux diplômés se proposant de poursuivre une carrière dans la fonction publique ou dans les affaires, où la connaissance de l'anglais et du français est exigée ou souhaitable. Tous les étudiants peuvent s'inscrire au concours, qu'ils aient suivi ou non des cours de français ou d'anglais à Mount Allison. Les candidats sont invités à s'adresser au Département de langues et littératures modernes, qui administre le Certificat de bilinguisme.

11.9.1 Information and Regulations/ Renseignements

Candidates may be of any linguistic background. Candidates must make formal application to take the tests no later than the end of the first term of their final year. Candidates will be examined in both French and English in the areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing. The examinations are comprehensive, and may include writing letters and essays or translations; reading literary or other complex texts; and conversation or oral discussion. There is no prescribed sequence of courses in either language leading to the examination for the Certificate. Candidates are invited to profit from the many possibilities offered by the University to improve their language skills.

Le concours est ouvert à tous les étudiants, quelle que soit leur langue maternelle. Les candidats sont priés de s'inscrire au concours au plus tard en décembre de leur année terminale à Mount Allison. Tous les candidats devront passer un examen qui consistera à écouter, parler, lire et écrire en français et en anglais. Il s'agit d'un examen d'ensemble, qui pourra comprendre la rédaction de lettres, d'essais ou de traductions; la lecture de textes littéraires ou techniques; et la participation à une conversation ou à une discussion. La préparation du Certificat n'est sujette à aucune série préétablie de cours. Les candidats sont toutefois encouragés à profiter des nombreuses possibilitiés dont on dispose à Mount Allison pour l'acquisition des deux langues officielles du Canada.

11.9.2 Standards/ Niveaux Requis

Candidates must demonstrate their ability in both languages to:

  1. follow and understand broadcasts, films and lectures,

  2. understand the main ideas of a complex text (book, article, report) without using a dictionary, and also to understand such a text thoroughly in a reasonable amount of time with the use of a dictionary,

  3. write a letter or report that is free of grammatical and stylistic errors,

  4. participate in conversation by expressing complex ideas, developing an argument, and answering questions.

Les candidats doivent démontrer, dans les deux langues, qu'ils sont capables:

  1. de suivre et de comprendre des émissions radiophoniques, des films, des conférences,

  2. de comprendre sans dictionnaire, les idées principales d'un texte complexe (livre, article, compte rendu); et de comprendre à fond le même genre de texte avec l'aide d'un dictionnaire dans une période de temps raisonnable,

  3. d'écrire une lettre ou un compte-rendu sans fautes de grammaire et sans erreurs de style,

  4. de prendre part à une conversation en exprimant des idées complexes, en élaborant et en développant un raisonnement, et en répondant à des questions.

11.10 Undergraduate Certificates

Mount Allison University may award undergraduate certificates as an embedded certificate taken concurrently with a degree program or as a free-standing credential. Certificates are thematic in nature, comprised of a breadth of available courses related to the theme and open to students across the university with no dependency on program of study. Certificate programs consist of a selection of courses worth 12–18 credits and must be authorized in advance by Senate. Students should plan their certificates well in advance. The listing of a certificate in the academic calendar does not guarantee that the requisite courses are available in any given year.

11.10.1 Embedded Certificates

A Senate approved certificate program may be completed as an embedded certificate taken concurrently with a degree program. The embedded certificate must be completed prior to graduation from the degree program, in order to be noted on the transcript.

11.10.2 Free-standing Certificates

A Senate approved certificate program may also be completed as a free-standing credential, taken independent of a degree program. Students who hold a Mount Allison degree may also apply for readmission following graduation as a candidate for a certificate, which may include some but not all courses required for the certificate that were completed as part of their undergraduate degree. A transcript and certificate are issued upon completion; however, the recipient does not participate in convocation.

Note:  Free-standing certificates are not available at this time

11.10.3 Certificate Programs Available

Certificate in Arts Administration
Certificate in Biopsychology
Certificate in Canadian Arts and Culture
Certificate in Community Engaged Learning
Certificate in Data Analytics
Certificate in Data Management
Certificate in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Certificate in Foundations of Health
Certificate in Mi'kmaq Studies
Certificate in Music Education
Certificate in Social Research Methodologies
Certificate in Studies of Indigenous History
Certificate in Theatre Arts
Certificate in Visual Literacy and Culture

11.11 Pre-Professional Requirements

A degree from Mount Allison, or a few carefully selected courses or electives as part of a Mount Allison degree, may permit a student admission to a professional program. Some of these programs include medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, law, education, theology, social work, audiology and speech, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, optometry, architecture and nutritional programs as well as many others. These professional programs may be accessed upon successful completion of courses and/or a degree from Mount Allison and in combination with other requirements as appropriate (e.g. LSAT, MCAT, GRE, etc.). All students contemplating applying to professional programs should consult the academic calendars of the schools involved carefully and should be aware of any standardized tests required. Interested students should consult the Academic and Career Counsellor for advice on course selection and the process to enter these professional programs after their undergraduate career at Mount Allison.

11.12 International Programs

11.12.1 Study Abroad and Exchange Programs

Students can add an international dimension to their university degree by participating in one of Mount Allison's many study-abroad and exchange programs. Most programs allow qualified students to complete a period of study at/through a partner institution for which students can be assessed for transfer of credit. To be considered for participation in one of these programs, students must be in Good Standing. In most cases, selection of participants is competitive and preference is given to students who have a GPA of at least 2.5 and who will be in their third year of study while away from Mount Allison. Some programs have further specific criteria (such as language requirements). Students are encouraged to consult with staff in the International Centre for more information about programs, requirements, and application procedures.

Mount Allison currently has partnerships with:

BI Norwegian Business School, Norway
Bilkent University, Turkey
Bowling Green State University, USA
City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China)
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China)
Dongguk University, South Korea
Eberhard-Karls-Universität (Tübingen), Germany
Ewha Womans University
Fudan University, China
Georgia Southern University, USA
The Hague University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands
Institut International D’Etudes Francaises (IIEF), Université de Strasbourg, France
Killam Fellowship, USA
Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan
Mid Sweden University, Sweden
Nordakademie, Germany
Phillips Universität Marburg, Germany
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso (PUCV), Chile
Sciences Po Strasbourg IEP, Université de Strasbourg, France
Université Angers, France
Universidad de Extremadura, Spain
Universidad de San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador
University of Bahamas, Bahamas
University of Kent, England
University of Limerick, Ireland
University of Newcastle, Australia
University of Otago, New Zealand
University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
University of Stirling, Scotland
University of Tasmania, Australia
Waseda University, Japan

Mount Allison also offers the following short-term study-abroad programs during the spring/summer term (note that not all study-abroad programs are offered each year):

Cross-Cultural College, Japan (in partnership with Queen's, University of Toronto, King’s College University at Western University, and Kwansei Gakuin University)
Summer Studies in India Program
Paris Summer Field School
Seville Summer Field School
Pompeii Archaeological Field School, Italy
Utrecht Field School - funded through the Global Skills Opportunity
Belize Field School - funded through the Global Skills Opportunity

11.12.2 MASSIE PROGRAM

The MASSIE Program (Mount Allison Semester Studies in English) offers an on-campus, full-immersion language experience for non-degree seeking students from partner universities. It allows students the opportunity to live and study in an English environment for one semester or less and receive academic credit at their home university. Students live in residence, are matched with Mount Allison conversation partners, and are fully integrated into all aspects of campus life. Students in the MASSIE program follow a specialized English curriculum that creates a rich learning environment so that their knowledge of English, their fluency in using English and their confidence in their ability to function in another language and society are all strengthened. Field trips and activities serve to introduce students to the history, culture and geography of Atlantic Canada. A volunteer component provides participants and community members with opportunities for hands-on learning and cross-cultural connections. Since the program's beginning in 2000, the program has had more than 1400 participants from Japan and has had over 1400 Mount Allison students as volunteers for the program. The MASSIE program has three sessions: summer, fall and winter. The summer and fall MASSIE programs are 15 week, full semester programs. The winter program is an intensive 6-week session that currently receives student from two partner universities: Toyo-Eiwa University and Kwansei Gakuin University.

11.12.3 Academic Credit for Independent Experiential Learning

Academic credit may be awarded for certain forms of independent experiential learning subject to the criteria listed below and with the approval of the appropriate committee. Normally, three credits per experience (to a maximum of 6 credits) may be assigned to an independent experiential learning course (EXPL 3/4000/01) as recommended by the course supervisor and approved by the Head of the Department. A letter grade will be assessed for the credit. A maximum of 6 credits may be included in a student's degree from this mechanism. Normally, students must have third year standing at the time of course approval and may not gain additional academic credit under this regulation where credit has been assigned as part of an existing Mount Allison course. Credit obtained from the independent experiential learning cannot be used to fulfill distribution requirements.

To be eligible for academic credit, the independent experiential learning must satisfy the following criteria:

  1. the experience is provided through an organization or institution which supports open inquiry and intellectual freedom,

  2. two months prior to the experience, the student must consult with an appropriate faculty supervisor and forward a study plan (see below, section c) to the Head of the Department for approval. The Head of the Department will confirm the decision with the Registrar, including the course to which credit will be assigned,

  3. the study plan submitted to the faculty supervisor and the Head of the Department must contain:

    1. a brief description of the intended experiential learning, including beginning and ending dates;

    2. an overview of the sponsoring organization and supporting documentation on the particular program, including a letter of acceptance noting the student's involvement, where appropriate;

    3. a description of any academic components required before or during the program (such as public seminars, pre-departure sessions, academic or cultural preparation); and

    4. a plan for the academic evaluation of the experience that demonstrates its contribution to the student's scholarly development. The study plan must include an analytical assignment which forms the basis for the assigning of academic credit. All elements of the study plan are to be completed before credit will be assigned,

  4. the requirements of the University’s policy on liability for student travel must be met,

  5. following the experience, the student shall request that a letter from the director/co-ordinator of the experience or program be submitted to the faculty supervisor confirming that the student completed the experiential learning program successfully.

Independent Experiential Learning

Prereq: Second year standing and special permission from the university. Please see 11.12.3 for details.
This is a university-wide course that provides credit for academic analysis of independent experiential learning. Normally a student may earn three credits (and up to six credits) per experience (to a maximum of six credits in a student's degree program) based on an independent experiential learning program evaluated under regulation 11.12.3.

Independent Experiential Learning

Prereq: Second year standing and special permission from the university. Please see 11.12.3 for details.
This is a university-wide course that provides credit for academic analysis of independent experiential learning. Normally a student may earn three credits (and up to six credits) per experience (to a maximum of six credits in a student's degree program) based on an independent experiential learning program evaluated under regulation 11.12.3.

Independent Experiential Learning

Prereq: Second year standing and special permission from the university. Please see 11.12.3 for details.
This is a university-wide course that provides credit for academic analysis of independent experiential learning. Normally a student may earn three credits (and up to six credits) per experience (to a maximum of six credits in a student's degree program) based on an independent experiential learning program evaluated under regulation 11.12.3.

Independent Experiential Learning

Prereq: Second year standing and special permission from the university. Please see 11.12.3 for details.
This is a university-wide course that provides credit for academic analysis of independent experiential learning. Normally a student may earn three credits (and up to six credits) per experience (to a maximum of six credits in a student's degree program) based on an independent experiential learning program evaluated under regulation 11.12.3.

11.13 University Special Topics Courses

Most courses at Mount Allison are offered by departments or programs and are designated with the associated course code. But there may be opportunities to offer a course in an interdisciplinary area or in a subject area that does not fall within any existing department or program. In such cases the course may be offered as a University Special Topic course.

University Special Topic

This course focuses on a topic not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2:When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for UNST 1991/2991/3991/4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

University Special Topic

This course focuses on a topic not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2:When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for UNST 1991/2991/3991/4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

University Special Topic

This course focuses on a topic not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2:When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for UNST 1991/2991/3991/4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

University Special Topic

This course focuses on a topic not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2:When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for UNST 1991/2991/3991/4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)

University Special Topic

This course focuses on a topic not covered by the current course offerings in a department or program. [Note 1: Prerequisite set by the Department/Program when the topic and level are announced. Note 2:When a Department or Program intends to offer a course under this designation, it must submit course information, normally at least three months in advance, to the Dean. Note 3: Students may register for UNST 1991/2991/3991/4991 more than once, provided the subject matter differs.] (Format: Variable)